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Construction Estimator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Masons of the world!!!

I am doing a wainscot project using manufactured thin stone on the front of my house. I have installed a vapor/water barrier and then applied Durock cement board over it. I know I do not need to use lath (Oh the horror of it all!:eek:) I just need to know is a scratch coat needed for proper bonding. I have seen some use no scratch and simply butter and stick. I just don't know if this is good enough. I plan on using Type S morter, and the "stone" is actually made up of "tiles" so-to-speak that are to have a dry stack appearance. Anybody????
 

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You should use a alkaline resistant tape and tape the seams. I would use a thin stone mortar, ask your local brick yard if they have some, follow the instructions on mixing it. Parge the wall and butter the back and stick it on. Point however you fancy but dont make a mess or it will be tough to get off. Sponge the stones if needed. Keep the water bucket clean. Cut a thinner stone then the one next to it to hide the cut.

Post pics when your done :)
 

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Construction Estimator
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
JBM,
Taping of the seams. Check. Do I do that with the parge coat? Should the parge cure prior to application, or should I apply while wet.
Also you said sponge the stone. To clean it? Or to wet it? Since this product has a dry stack look, there's no tucking. Sorry for the silly questions but masonry is usually done by the time my trade shows up on the job!
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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Follow manufacture specs and you can't go wrong. I find that novices benefit from the better grip a scratch coat provides.
 

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Hi Parker ,
Stone veneer mortar is what they call it in our neck of the woods and it's really like mortar and thin-set mixed. It's stickier than type s, but also kinda runny. And I would agree with JBM and would use it for this sort of job.

Also agree a scratch coat not needed as long as the finished wall is strong enough to not flex when bumped with a lawnmower or rake.

What I do sometimes with a stack stone, is to add color to my mortar to match the stone, and do a quick parge coat as I go. This is just so no gray cement, or durock would be visible through any small gaps there might be. If you're dealing with those Chinese panels a little adjustment with the grinder here and there and you can lay them tight so there shouldn't be any gaps.

Dave
 

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I agree with JBM, dbrons and CJkarl. Use a thin veneer mortar and add some colour, black is good too so that it look like shadow rather than mortar. If you can't find thin veneer mortar, add a pile of acrylic additive to a regular mix, that helps with the sticking. And if you wet the back of the stone you make sure there is no dust effecting the bond, and if you dampen the cement board, you ensure that the board doesn't suck too much moisture out of the mortar. Personally I don't think a parge coat is needed, but it won't hurt...unless you put it on too thick
 

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I was referring to applying mud to the board and then to the back of the stone, not necessarily parging the whole board, more parge as you go to get it to stick/bond properly. You know, like tile lol.
 
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