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Metal Stud Framer
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I've been in the commercial drywall trades for some 29 years and it seems every company I've worked for (except union shops) have this reoccuring problem. I've been sent out to install acousitc ceilings with lasers that don't work, Hitli guns that don't work and given the wrong tools for a job. Recently, we needed chop saw blades, asked for them for two days and when the super showed up I asked him if he brought any blades and he told me they were in his truck. 45 minutes later and asking two more times the guy finally got them to me.
This may seem like a stupid question but I'd like to know how and why these people are still working in this capacity.
Its ridiculous and really makes it hard for guys like me to respect them much less work my fingers to the bone for them. Maybe its just my area but...
 

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I've been in the commercial drywall trades for some 29 years and it seems every company I've worked for (except union shops) have this reoccuring problem. I've been sent out to install acousitc ceilings with lasers that don't work, Hitli guns that don't work and given the wrong tools for a job. Recently, we needed chop saw blades, asked for them for two days and when the super showed up I asked him if he brought any blades and he told me they were in his truck. 45 minutes later and asking two more times the guy finally got them to me.
This may seem like a stupid question but I'd like to know how and why these people are still working in this capacity.
Its ridiculous and really makes it hard for guys like me to respect them much less work my fingers to the bone for them. Maybe its just my area but...
The superintendent for your company or the PS for the GC?
 

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It's cut-throat man.

No money in the budget for those pesky overruns like blades and RotoZip bits and tips for the screw guns. There was this one job where the contractor didn't have an issue with any of that stuff. Brand new screw guns for the new guys that showed up. New bits every week, no issues. The only reason is because it was a T&M job and they came in to "save the day" after the previous company got fired.

I'm only 28 and I don't expect to ever see that again...
 

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I worked commercial during the boom, some forming and framing, mostly interiors. We had new Hilti cordless tools, including band saws in every gang box.

You can't expect good, efficient work without providing proper equipment and tools.
 

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GC/carpenter
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When I first got started in the trades in 1984 or so, I was the laborer that was in charge of the trailer which was a semi trailer. I made sure everyone had sharp blades and all the tools were in good working order. Most companies of that size did the same thing. Someone needs that as their only job. It keeps things rolling. I also kept the skip loader maintained and the bobcat. Everyone knew they couldn't go home until everything was accounted for. I took that job seriously.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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From what I understand, that job title is called "project engineer" nowadays but the superintendent usually covers both positions.

I was on a site a couple of months ago where the P.E. was very astute in his duties. He had no problem with supplying everyone with sharp blades. It's just that he demanded that you bring back the dull/broken blade first

But anyhow, in your situation, Zendik, the super is probably overworked and poorly scheduled. Thus waiting 45 minute for the blade was like 5 minutes to him. With all of the issues, problems and fires that were going on before you asked him inadvertently caused you to end up on the back burner.
 

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From what I understand, that job title is called "project engineer" nowadays but the superintendent usually covers both positions.

I was on a site a couple of months ago where the P.E. was very astute in his duties. He had no problem with supplying everyone with sharp blades. It's just that he demanded that you bring back the dull/broken blade first

But anyhow, in your situation, Zendik, the super is probably overworked and poorly scheduled. Thus waiting 45 minute for the blade was like 5 minutes to him. With all of the issues, problems and fires that were going on before you asked him inadvertently caused you to end up on the back burner.
Thats a feild engineer , hoss.

A Project engineer is an office job.
 

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Project Engineer Job Duties:

Develops project objectives by reviewing project proposals and plans; conferring with management.

Determines project responsibilities by identifying project phases and elements; assigning personnel to phases and elements; reviewing bids from contractors.

Determines project specifications by studying product design, customer requirements, and performance standards; completing technical studies; preparing cost estimates.Confirms product performance by designing and conducting tests.

Determines project schedule by studying project plan and specifications; calculating time requirements; sequencing project elements.Maintains project schedule by monitoring project progress; coordinating activities; resolving problems.Controls project plan by reviewing design, specifications, and plan and schedule changes; recommending actions.Controls project costs by approving expenditures; administering contractor contracts.Prepares project status reports by collecting, analyzing, and summarizing information and trends; recommending actions.Maintains safe and clean working environment by enforcing procedures, rules, and regulations.

Maintains project data base by writing computer programs; entering and backing up data.

Maintains product and company reputation by complying with federal and state regulations.Contributes to team effort by accomplishing related results as needed.
 
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GC/carpenter
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Jaws said:
Thats a feild engineer , hoss. A Project engineer is an office job.
We used to call them pink shirts. Seemed like they always came out to the site in pink shirts. Could've been an 80's thing though.
 

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A field engineer is a professional who works at job sites other than the main company office or headquarters.

This person often services clients at their homes or businesses. He or she may work in a variety of fields, and can be responsible for installing hardware, servicing a machine, or the maintenance and repair of already-installed products.

Expertise in the area of service, including a strong familiarity with the product, creativity, and problem-solving abilities are all good skills for a field engineer to develop. Since field engineers typically work directly with clients, it can be beneficial to have strong communication skills as well. Good fine motor skills and dexterity are often required.
 

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We used to call them pink shirts. Seemed like they always came out to the site in pink shirts. Could've been an 80's thing though.
The GC I was a foreman and for a short time a super for became a state agency. There was neither of these positions.

As a PS I developed the schedule and ran the job.

As a feild super (main job) I ran 11 to 27 guys. PM sent work folders with start dates, scopes of work and budget. Purchasing purchased my material lists. I assigned personnel to each project, scheduled the job using Project, scheduled and oversaw subs and crews, some client interaction.

You can bet every one had the stuff they needed when they needed it.
 
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Now a days I give them what they give me. I do residential, But If the framing is ****ed I will ask for it to be fixed and show them what I need. If they don't do it that's on them.
 

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Project Superintendent
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Thats a feild engineer , hoss.

A Project engineer is an office job.
Train Drivers!

Around here it's any kid that gets hired straight out of college and sent out to the field to get some real world experience before they disappear into that parallel world called "the office"
 

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commercial
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124 Posts
gotta have the right tools for the job. i go through this all the time, i always had my own supply without the superintendant knowing. i would ask for the stuff i needed but in the meantime use my personal stock supply. once the order got there i would take what i needed. this is how i stayed efficient, by not running out of of the essentials.
 

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Nowadays all I seem to do is get stuff for people to expedite the work.
My problem is the other side of the coin. I ask the most senior employee on a job to make me a list daily of what is going to be needed. They can't seem to grasp this. And as soon as I leave after the daily delivery I get a panic call from the job that we are out of screws ,or plaster colorant, or no wheels for the scaffolding. Hey- you should have seen that coming yesterday. I just left and am off to the next project.
 
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