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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

This is my first post on this site, and i'm not sure if I'm putting this in the right section.

I'm working on a mold remediation project for a large warehouse with an exposed plywood roof. The warehouse is a standard wood framed building that had its roof replaced last summer. The 1/2" plywood panels that made up the roof were rained on during construction and not dried out properly. We are going to use dehumidifiers to dry the plywood from the underside before treating the mold. The issue I'm having is finding a way to estimate the time it will take for the water within the plywood to migrate to the exposed surface. This seems to be the limiting factor in how fast we can dry the wood to an acceptable moisture content since we can only dry from the one exposed surface. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Dustin
 

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Going to depend on how wet the plywood is, ambient temp, humidity, air flow and how much air you can run through your dehumidifers & how fast they can work.

English translation is who knows? A lot of variables.
 

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Are you saying you have mold from the wet plywood?

Seems odd as I have seen and put down soaking wet plywood aND osb AND NEVER SEEN MOLD DEVELOP
.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the quick replies guys. I did leave some details out of the first post, so allow me to clarify.

The roof was replaced last summer with plywood that was rained on, so it was installed wet. The roof membrane was then installed but the contractor decided they didn't need to insulate the roof.

The warehouse is used for food processing so it has a high internal humidity level. So at night the uninsulated roof allows the moisture in the air to condense on the surface of the plywood. I believe this was the root cause for the mold growth.

So my plan is to dump dry air in the space to get the water at the surface of the wood to evaporate. What I can't seem to figure out is how long the water within the wood will take to migrate to the exposed surface once i begin drying it.

Once the wood reaches an appropriate moisture content we will treat the mold and apply insulation to the roof. I just need an accurate estimate of the time it will take for the wood to reach its equilibrium moisture content.
 
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