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dry look granite veneer with copper drips on lintels for brick

2772 Views 16 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  JBM
this was done with years of left over various typs of granite blocks and peices. the blocks were up to 16'' thick and 24'' high before I used to gather granite as a teen with the old mans 55 international 5 yrd dump. Some of the large stone came from a victorian carriage house in Derby where they sat in the basement for 150 years.This is waterproof and treated and treated ie the mortar comes to the frront and is raked via worn out slickers

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What was that you sent me about the dampers? Very cryptic.
Looks good.

You New Englanders sure like the dry look huh?
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I was inviting you to whitness the 1:30 fireplace in action. One year testing done applying asap then having some designers/architechs/
masons over.
I may have 1st selectman [my friend] and thinking about channel 8.

The investor [Rabbi /Friend /customer came last night in 60 degree weather which was bad for draft. It worked flawless and he was stunned....kept asking what the normal throat depth is for a comparable fp. When I told him 4'' fixed, for all fps, he balked at me then later asked again.
I showed him Buckly's replys to me stating his fps get a 1:20 as well as him saying he was interested as soon as I could divulge all to him. He laughed at Jim refusing to sign a non disclosure while asking for better videos in the past. :no:
http://www.youtube.com/my_videos?o=U :censored:
Regards Frank
What was that you sent me about the dampers? Very cryptic.
Sean I really don't like the dry look. Cutting stone I like
With dry look the little chips can be tedius esp with certain stone and especially when the finger tips are worn!

Certain dark stone can be chipped with slate..works well in fact some of it is in this job. Bastard granite [stratified grain] also is makes nice razors.On bed joints they slip in without lift. Sometimes the worse thing is to lay too tight then try to get bed chips to fit just to simulate a dry wall. The key in dry look is to learn to treasure certain shaped chips which result when cutting ie pegs especially triangulars etc. as they can
take much time making and finding.Certain stone produce them in quantity others do not...same scenario with razors and when one is abundand the other usually isn't!

My father would tell me stories of when he was a kid he would put little pegs [he called them "chinkers" in the wider joints of my grandfather's stone work. The old man would remove them and he'd sneak them back in...lol. I'd give anything to see that in a video!

I like doing a nice thin even joint but dry is very popular...and the thin stone installers love it.....I see big problems regarding that stuff ie leaks and mold and basic failure,especially veneers where tyvec or similar is used behind it.
Looks good.

You New Englanders sure like the dry look huh?
I know that style of jointing as "chinked and fitted".
Sean I really don't like the dry look. Cutting stone I like
With dry look the little chips can be tedius esp with certain stone and especially when the finger tips are worn!

Certain dark stone can be chipped with slate..works well in fact some of it is in this job. Bastard granite [stratified grain] also is makes nice razors.On bed joints they slip in without lift. Sometimes the worse thing is to lay too tight then try to get bed chips to fit just to simulate a dry wall. The key in dry look is to learn to treasure certain shaped chips which result when cutting ie pegs especially triangulars etc. as they can
take much time making and finding.Certain stone produce them in quantity others do not...same scenario with razors and when one is abundand the other usually isn't!

My father would tell me stories of when he was a kid he would put little pegs [he called them "chinkers" in the wider joints of my grandfather's stone work. The old man would remove them and he'd sneak them back in...lol. I'd give anything to see that in a video!

I like doing a nice thin even joint but dry is very popular...and the thin stone installers love it.....I see big problems regarding that stuff ie leaks and mold and basic failure,especially veneers where tyvec or similar is used behind it.
Looks good.

You New Englanders sure like the dry look huh?
Huh, thought I had posted already.

When you put the chips in a dry look wall I know that joint as being "chinked and fitted"
Better than big mortar joints yes, I do.
Looks good.

You New Englanders sure like the dry look huh?
Don't get me wrong I like it too, and i certainly appreciate the skill that goes in to doing it well, it just that there is very little around here and most of the work that you, Karl, Francis and JBM seem to post is dry laid, or at least dry look. I guess it's popular there
I was taught to use a mudded joint, all my stuff has mud in there, I just rake it out pretty deep and keep em tight as I can. Someday Ill do some more with more dry stuff...

"tight is right"
"thin is in"

But for sure that is some nice looking granite!
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I always assumed there would be a very thin bed of mortar to stop a driving rain( or any rain for that matter) seeping through the joints. Is this the case?
Yes, but not to stop the water. Even with a good bed of mortar the water will wick right through the stone. Whenever you veneer, around here anyway, you must always figure that water will get behind the stone.
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Well it's not that dire! good bond/good stone = no leaks!

However 30lb felt and fab flashed lintels anyhow. The full 4 / 6'' stone combined with multiple placements results in nicks in the tyvec or other breathable tissue papers available out there.

The stone veneer is my house and I did say I sealed it, and very successfully.
Had it had crevaces throughout or non bond it would not be possible nor would any lateral strength be had.

What a wrongly laid dry look veneer, of any thickness, will cause is black mold.

This is what is coming soon. All the thin/cultured stone laid on one coat of wire lath especially the dry look ones. i.e. no brown coat for thickness and waterproofing...they mostly use flat un dimpled lath which has no rivit effect so the mortar is all on one side of the wire!
Yes, but not to stop the water. Even with a good bed of mortar the water will wick right through the stone. Whenever you veneer, around here anyway, you must always figure that water will get behind the stone.
The thin stone people better be doubling up that paper.
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