Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a chance to work with a guy that has a dry ice blast set up mobile with a 375 compressor airless and hydrostatic paint set ups and a shop for inhouse work, basicly he's looking for someone to do the work and he supplies all materials, equipment etc. he doesn't want an employee or to pay me an hourly wage he wants someone to run the show find the work and do it and take a percentage , I have a couple of questions since I know nothing about dry ice blasting, 1/ what are the pros and cons of dry ice and 2/ what are the main markets for dry ice comparied to regular blasting and how market and get the jobs 3/ what is the going rate for dry ice blasting. this sounds like a great opportunity but not if I can't find the work, it's very hard to get into the fire restoration side around here because they seem to use there own equipment or out of town companies, I have a "IN" at a mold removal company but he says he uses chemicals for 90% of his work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
I have a chance to work with a guy that has a dry ice blast set up mobile with a 375 compressor airless and hydrostatic paint set ups and a shop for inhouse work, basicly he's looking for someone to do the work and he supplies all materials, equipment etc. he doesn't want an employee or to pay me an hourly wage he wants someone to run the show find the work and do it and take a percentage , I have a couple of questions since I know nothing about dry ice blasting, 1/ what are the pros and cons of dry ice and 2/ what are the main markets for dry ice comparied to regular blasting and how market and get the jobs 3/ what is the going rate for dry ice blasting. this sounds like a great opportunity but not if I can't find the work, it's very hard to get into the fire restoration side around here because they seem to use there own equipment or out of town companies, I have a "IN" at a mold removal company but he says he uses chemicals for 90% of his work
I'll try to answer your questions best I can - as well, use the search function and you should find tons of info in DIB.

1) cons - dry ice as a media is expensive BUT you should be able to get a decent rate from a local gases supply company (ie Praxair, Contenential Carbonic, Air Liquide etc.)
- short shelf life - sucks when you buy the dry ice and job gets postponed or canceled etc.

2) Food service industry is a huge market - most are using dry ice or have their own machines but I still find they like to sub the work out. Basically any manufacturing plant that cleans but doesn't want the mess of water or soda etc. My MAIN industry is Mould - most of my mould work consists of dry ice blasting (attics, basements, crawl spaces, Marijuana grow ops)

3) going rate varies depending on what you are doing, like most blasting work...I basically just do mould at the moment an I charge a square foot fee BUT because of the type of work (hazordous...not really but it is considered this) and other things involved before you even blast its a totally different charge.

Well, if he's only using chemicals he is certainly not a 'mould guy' and doing things incorrectly BUT if he follows all other guidelines and sprays (if thats what he does) and sands and physically removes the mould from the premises then he's ok...sorry, I come across that ALL too oftem when a "Mold Remediation Contractor" has been in before me and sprayed a chemical and charged an eroneous amount - LEAVING the mould there...it doesn't just vanish after spraying...lol.
 

·
Rick
Joined
·
86 Posts
Not trying to be a smart ass but If you have to hustle all the work and perform all the work why not do it for yourself?

The only reason I say anything is I owned a franchise for years and gave 10% every month away, Going at it alone was hard at first, no leads, no equipment financing other than what i could get with my own credit.

Consider renting equipment as you get the jobs,
Again, this is not intended to offend, its tough to give away 10 percent.


Good Luck
 

·
Glen
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
Ok Zeke, here is my take on it. I hear what Rick is saying but here is the big difference. Rick you must have paid quite a bit for the privilage of having the franchise. And you have many restrictions on how you could ever get out of it. Zeke, you on the other hand have a very cool oportunity I think. No money of your own spent, no commitment, you get to practice and learn the business on his time and dime and then when you are ready you will with out doubt take many of your customers with you when you leave. Do not sign a non competiton agreement of any kind and enjoy the free education while you prepare to get your own equipment. He must know you will not stay with him forever and if he was worried about it he would do it on his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
One more thing that I didn't see mentioned yet. Dry Ice blasting is done by using dry ice, which is frozen carbon dioxide. If you blast with it in any type of enclosed space, or even in larger areas, it is strongly recommended that you use a portable air supply.

This is probably a common sense thing that you already know about, but the dry ice will displace the breathable air in the room and could be very dangerous if you are doing it alone.

Again, hope you have already read up on it and know of the risks. It works great removing fire damage on wood, concrete, and brick. It'll strip the paint off of metal, I've even seen it clean an asphalt paver, and that old asphalt was caked on there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Market yourself as the "green alternative" and target log homes in need of refinishing. Then, convert those that think Sikkens is the best thing for log homes and sell them the alternative ie., non-film building paints. Better yet, farm out the refinishing to someone else. Typically log homes are built in clusters, at least that is the case around here. Get to know what the capabilities are and sell, sell, sell. Big advantage to blasting is you get a uniform finish when done. No blotching due to color variations from old paint remaining. Second plus is environmentally safe and non toxic. Only thing you need to do is remove the old bits and pieces of paint from the site. Farm that out too if you want. I see the next generation moving into my area and they love the logs. They understand that they will have some maintenance on the exterior but they have no idea how much work it takes to keep these things looking good. Your rig is portable so take your show on the road. Find an area with little compitition. Float a trial ballon by putting an ad in the paper. Try and find a log centre that is used by the community, maybe the community centre or chamber of commerce. Do that and you have a reference people can easily go to to see your work. The town council will love you if you can push the environmental angle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Market yourself as the "green alternative" and target log homes in need of refinishing. Then, convert those that think Sikkens is the best thing for log homes and sell them the alternative ie., non-film building paints. Better yet, farm out the refinishing to someone else. Typically log homes are built in clusters, at least that is the case around here. Get to know what the capabilities are and sell, sell, sell. Big advantage to blasting is you get a uniform finish when done. No blotching due to color variations from old paint remaining. Second plus is environmentally safe and non toxic. Only thing you need to do is remove the old bits and pieces of paint from the site. Farm that out too if you want. I see the next generation moving into my area and they love the logs. They understand that they will have some maintenance on the exterior but they have no idea how much work it takes to keep these things looking good. Your rig is portable so take your show on the road. Find an area with little compitition. Float a trial ballon by putting an ad in the paper. Try and find a log centre that is used by the community, maybe the community centre or chamber of commerce. Do that and you have a reference people can easily go to to see your work. The town council will love you if you can push the environmental angle.
I've attempted Log (and cedar) in the past with Dry Ice and it doesn't work - have you had a different result? certain nozzle(s) possibly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Have a look at this video. Abrasive removal using dry ice depends alot on the equipment and it is less forgiving than sand or soda. More to it than just throwing sand into a pressure pot. I would go to a store and compare their systems to the one you are looking at. Each system will have limitations, kind of like buying a MIG welder. Some will weld only at 3/16" thick plate but others will do 1" thick plate.
 

·
Trial and Error Opperator
Joined
·
2,018 Posts
I've seen video of dry ice taking dust and crud off old books with no damage. Utube or some place like that.
I to was asked to go 50/50 with a guy that does DIB,
I found out he wanted the money and wanted me to do all the work.
some day i'll get into DIB but for now I'm sticking with my own business doing Soda and Glass.
I like the no mess after, and there are plenty of job's that are done with soda that could be done with ice (Grafitti?). (Like Soda It doesn't take off rust)

Like I said in other posts,
"They're are differnt type's of media for every type of job."

Do your home work first, then jump!
Good luck :thumbsup:
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top