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beat and 3 rooms left
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hey guys and gal, I have a dentist office in bev. hlls. that has really dry gyp-crete. the top crust has been compromised, removed and discarded with the old material. Now i'm stuck with soft, sandy substrate... anybody have success putting a topping or primer on this kind of situation rendering it suitable for armstrong 6' sheet goods?
 

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Maxxon makes a sealer for their gypcrete. I suppose at this point it will be use at your own risk. You have to be careful with portand based patching compounds over gypcrete.
 

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Flooring Installer
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I have never had any luck sealing gypcrete. Portland based products won't normally stick to it.

My uncle, told me 50 years ago that gypcrete was never intended to be used for floors. He worked in a place making the stuff. It was only supposed to have a 30 year life span. Then contractors discovered if they used it for floors, because it was so much lighter than concrete, they could save millions on structural support. and money rules over common sense.
One of the apt complexes where I did flooring, had 1/2" plywood decking and 2" of gypcrete for the floors. It was broke up into little pieces, so we covered it with Kangaback carpet so they could be rented. You could still feel the stuff move around under the carpet.
 

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hey guys and gal, I have a dentist office in bev. hlls. that has really dry gyp-crete. the top crust has been compromised, removed and discarded with the old material. Now i'm stuck with soft, sandy substrate... anybody have success putting a topping or primer on this kind of situation rendering it suitable for armstrong 6' sheet goods?
This is a really common situation with lightweight concrete, gypsum based or not in commercial settings. There are different kinds of patch that can be applied depending of the specific type of lightweight, the degree of damage done to it and the finished flooring type. You've got to scrape and vacuum, then seal/prime a couple or three times prior to using any patch. I'd consult with Armstrong to make sure they'll warranty the specific product to the type of underlayment. Ardex makes gypsum compatible underlayments but I'm pretty sure Armstrong doesn't like any of those underlayments that are not CEMENT based.

You may need to consider a switch of flooring choices if you want a solid manufacturer's warranty.
 
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