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Is it actually the brake or is it the e brake?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
duburban said:
Don't they dissipate heat better/last longer?
They hold heat longer because they can't be vented like a normal disc brake can and there's a **** ton of steel that holds the heat once they do heat up. They are meant to need changing out less often though but that alone is not enough reason to use them. It's just cheap in my eyes.
 

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There are a bunch of reasons:

Drums cost less. In the rear, drums work just as well as disc. Chevy had big problems with rear disc brakes rusting; the dust shield would rot off leaving the disc exposed and the caliper hardware would constantly get rusted up and stop functioning. Drums keep the hardware all contained

personally (and I'm a chevy guy) I think they had a poor design. I also question the quality of GM vehicles in the last 10 years
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Texas Wax said:
....tractor trailers and most heavy equipment have what kind of brakes?
Air disc brakes on the decent ones. Not that it really applies to pick ups as as they are hydraulic.



Auto part Disc brake Brake Vehicle brake Rotor


Disc brakes have come a long way in the last 20 years. There's no need to use drums anymore.
 

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Apparently GM seems to disagree with you. :laughing:
 

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It's retro, it's repeating itself. It's in vogue..:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Inner10 said:
I'd pay extra for rear drumb, they don't get enough use and the winter weather causes rear disc calipers to seize up.
I was curious of this so just done some reading. It seems that brakes sticking in cold is due to a poorly maintained brake system more than the brakes being worse in cold weather. I guess if aircraft use disc's in temps as cold as -60 then they must be pretty reliable systems.
 

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I was curious of this so just done some reading. It seems that brakes sticking in cold is due to a poorly maintained brake system more than the brakes being worse in cold weather. I guess if aircraft use disc's in temps as cold as -60 then they must be pretty reliable systems.
The problem in Ontario is we use a massive amount of brine, and salt/stone mix on our roads in the winter. The open design of disc brakes causes the sliders and guides on the calipers to get really corroded and stick which causes one pad to wear out completely while the other is untouched often damaging the rotor.

This isn't a problem with front breaks as they enjoy far more movement than the rears and don't get the opportunity to get gummed up as fast.

Sure this can be solved by cleaning and lubing your break components on a regular basis but rear drum breaks are virtually maintenance free.

Drum breaks have massive breaking power relative to the amount of force that is required to activate them although like you said after they heat up the drum expands and they don't work properly. In addition most disc break pads are easier to change than shoes.

But I don't think that having rear drum brakes is in anyway inferior to the performance of the vehicle.
 

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One of the main reasons to use drums in the rear is stopping power. The drum lacks it and it is a good thing on average. You don't lock up the back breaks with no load in the truck. The fronts do 85% of the stopping anyway.
 

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The problem in Ontario is we use a massive amount of brine, and salt/stone mix on our roads in the winter. The open design of disc brakes causes the sliders and guides on the calipers to get really corroded and stick which causes one pad to wear out completely while the other is untouched often damaging the rotor.

This isn't a problem with front breaks as they enjoy far more movement than the rears and don't get the opportunity to get gummed up as fast.

Sure this can be solved by cleaning and lubing your break components on a regular basis but rear drum breaks are virtually maintenance free.

Drum breaks have massive breaking power relative to the amount of force that is required to activate them although like you said after they heat up the drum expands and they don't work properly. In addition most disc break pads are easier to change than shoes.

But I don't think that having rear drum brakes is in anyway inferior to the performance of the vehicle.

Yup, that damn salt!
 
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