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Shingler extraordinaire
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is drip edge necessary on the rakes? we are using it along the eaves.
I feel drip is necessary weather code requires it or not, however, to answer your question I'd put it on for at least good looks if you're already putting it on the eaves. That would just look too look tacky.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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Drip edge isn't necessary anywhere, as long as the roofing material is applied properly. But you're going to have a tough time of making a good-looking job without it.
 

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Shingler extraordinaire
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Drip edge isn't necessary anywhere, as long as the roofing material is applied properly. But you're going to have a tough time of making a good-looking job without it.
it is if you don't want drooping and cracking edges, or want to stop wind driven rain from getting to the roof deck
 

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Yes , we use drip on the rakes . I think it looks cleaner and saves time overall and yes for holding the alum. facia if that is applied .
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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it is if you don't want drooping and cracking edges, or want to stop wind driven rain from getting to the roof deck
Technically true. OTOH, any day of the week I could show you multiple decades-old sheds with no drip edge and healthy roof decks. :thumbsup:
 

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We always run a rake edge here and all the jobs that have specs require it.
The specs always required rake over the top of felt paper to keep wind driven rain over the top of felt.

Also:
It will help hold aluminum facia if the HO ever decides to go that route.

I always use I&W at the rake, and the drip edge is always installed before the I&W is put down. So the I&W is ran OVER the drip edge on the rakes, and under the drip edge on the gable ends.

If water penetrates the roof at any point and runs down the underlayment at the rake, it will run right behind the drip edge/fascia.
 

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I always use I&W at the rake, and the drip edge is always installed before the I&W is put down. So the I&W is ran OVER the drip edge on the rakes, and under the drip edge on the gable ends.

If water penetrates the roof at any point and runs down the underlayment at the rake, it will run right behind the drip edge/fascia.
IMHO,
It's a nice precaution,but I believe it is overkill and just another way for more I&W to be sold.

Thirty something years of tearing off roofs and never saw any damage from leakage along the rakes.
 

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Shingler extraordinaire
Sales Estimator/ Project Manager
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IMHO,
It's a nice precaution,but I believe it is overkill and just another way for more I&W to be sold.

Thirty something years of tearing off roofs and never saw any damage from leakage along the rakes.
I've seen some, some from ice too. I also like putting the drip over the underlayment on the rakes.
 

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roofbutcher
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IMHO,
It's a nice precaution,but I believe it is overkill and just another way for more I&W to be sold.

Thirty something years of tearing off roofs and never saw any damage from leakage along the rakes.
Agreed.

You don't need a roof under the roof if you know how to roof.

Drip edge does look nice on the rakes though.
 

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I like to use drip edge all around rakes and eaves, it just looks clean and is short money. Maybe a good question toinclude in the discussion is do you prefer aluminum or galvi drip edge and why?????
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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Maybe a good question toinclude in the discussion is do you prefer aluminum or galvi drip edge and why?????
Aluminum, no contest. Galvanized will rust sooner or later. Every nail hole and cut edge is a starting point.
 

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Aluminum, no contest. Galvanized will rust sooner or later. Every nail hole and cut edge is a starting point.
Also works better with the rest of the flashings for a roof. Metals should not be mixed.:no:

On the other hand, if you have a real ragged edge it's easier to straighten out with painted steel. Always pros and cons.
 
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