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Shingler extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am doing my brother-in-laws roof in Indianapolis next month and noticed while I was there last week, I only saw drip on a few houses, lots of new and old roofs with no drip. Does Indiana really not require it? I'm putting it on either way and already informed my brother-in-law about this. Any roofers here from Indiana?
 

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Curmudgeon
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I have only used it rarely.
I didn't put it on my house.
 

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I'm out in western Michigan and I keep reading about these homes with no drip edge.

How is the fascia ran? Just painted wood fascia up to the shingles?

I'm 28 and have never seen a home with no drip edge.
 

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I see a lot of homes without drip edge. In Minnesota we have some of the most strict building and roofing codes in the nation and drip edge is not required by code. Have heard rumors of some associations that have wood exteriors that drip edge is not allowed as they want to stay away from metal exteriors and stick with the all wood look.

The only time I don't put on drip edge is when the fascia is painted a color that no drip edge will even come close with that the home owner is happy with. In those cases we put down strips of ice and water shield on the rakes and do a 3/4 inch overhang.
 

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Indiana Drip edge

NWI here. We do it almost all the time. Exception would be w/ some cedar jobs. But I still put it on.

Indianapolis is further south and the requirments are different. A different climate zone
 

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Construction Connoissuer
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90% of new homes do not have it around here,..:no: I always install it myself, but the main reason I figure is cost. Big builders competing on prices, cutting corners, and reducing costs. It doesn't seem like much saving to you or I, but when you multiply it by the thousands of home they eliminated it on, they saved alot! To say the least! The warrantys will be long up, when the problems arrive. Job security for guys like me I guess, it surely does lead to serious water damage, and insect damage. Most homes and housing additions where developed by big name builders, and they saved millions,..

No worries here, I'll fix them right as they fall in to place,..:thumbsup:
 

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Shingler extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
90% of new homes do not have it around here,..:no: I always install it myself, but the main reason I figure is cost. Big builders competing on prices, cutting corners, and reducing costs. It doesn't seem like much saving to you or I, but when you multiply it by the thousands of home they eliminated it on, they saved alot! To say the least! The warrantys will be long up, when the problems arrive. Job security for guys like me I guess, it surely does lead to serious water damage, and insect damage. Most homes and housing additions where developed by big name builders, and they saved millions,..

No worries here, I'll fix them right as they fall in to place,..:thumbsup:
You won't be fixing mine.:thumbup:
 

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I see a lot of homes without drip edge. In Minnesota we have some of the most strict building and roofing codes in the nation and drip edge is not required by code. Have heard rumors of some associations that have wood exteriors that drip edge is not allowed as they want to stay away from metal exteriors and stick with the all wood look.

The only time I don't put on drip edge is when the fascia is painted a color that no drip edge will even come close with that the home owner is happy with. In those cases we put down strips of ice and water shield on the rakes and do a 3/4 inch overhang.
Agreed, we do similar. We just hang over the starter shingles on eaves and rakes. Some may be using a hardie board, but haven't seen wood in awhile besides cedar on some 1980's homes.


Some areas are far behind in this area. Some are more advanced with the PVC boards. Wood fascias and soffit haven't been used up here for 15 years or so on anything new.
Who wants to paint??????........
 

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I can see how using Ice and Water and a 3/4" over hang could help prevent any water from penetrating your roof deck, rather than using drip edge.

But I don't see why it would be done?

It's not anymore cost effective to go through those measures than it is to just install drip edge..... Drip edge installs fast, it comes in 10' or 12' sticks, it takes less than an hour to run drip edge on a standard house.

I'd be scared to put a 3/4" over hang off the gable end of a roof though too, seems like on a real hot day the pliable shingles from the heat could certainly start to "bend" or fold over the fascia.

I run drip edge, run starter flush with the drip on the rake over hang, and over hang the shingles 3/8". On the gable ends, I over hang the starter 1/4" all the way up to get a nice strait 1/4" over hang and cut the shingles to match.

I think you could do a roof with out drip edge, but I just don't see why you would. Even if you are a big home builder, building 1000's of homes and trying to save $200 per home by not putting on drip edge, anyone who has a home inspection is probably going to notice that. Build a good home, market it at a fair price and it will sell fast enough to make up for the $200 in drip edge.
 

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Curmudgeon
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I can see how using Ice and Water and a 3/4" over hang could help prevent any water from penetrating your roof deck, rather than using drip edge.

But I don't see why it would be done?

It's not anymore cost effective to go through those measures than it is to just install drip edge..... Drip edge installs fast, it comes in 10' or 12' sticks, it takes less than an hour to run drip edge on a standard house.

I'd be scared to put a 3/4" over hang off the gable end of a roof though too, seems like on a real hot day the pliable shingles from the heat could certainly start to "bend" or fold over the fascia.

I run drip edge, run starter flush with the drip on the rake over hang, and over hang the shingles 3/8". On the gable ends, I over hang the starter 1/4" all the way up to get a nice strait 1/4" over hang and cut the shingles to match.

I think you could do a roof with out drip edge, but I just don't see why you would. Even if you are a big home builder, building 1000's of homes and trying to save $200 per home by not putting on drip edge, anyone who has a home inspection is probably going to notice that. Build a good home, market it at a fair price and it will sell fast enough to make up for the $200 in drip edge.
Unless there is aluminum or vinyl
fascia, or a 3 pitch, I don't see the need.
I've seen a lot of roofs, never saw
one fail for lack of drip, unless something
more basic was screwed up too.
Seeing a guy cover a pretty old
barge mold with a piece of aluminum
hurts my eyes.
I have seen plenty of problems caused
by drip and gutters interfering with each other.
I guess it's best to do what makes you
comfortable...
This from a guy who wears a belt and suspenders. :laughing:
 

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Most of the rot I've seen on eave boards was with deteriated organic three tabs. Once the eye lines open up and the stater below deteriates the felt won't last until the decking is exposed to the elements.
 

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Shingler extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I usually see it from wind driven rain and ice with improperly installed drip.
 

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3/4" + overhang of the shingles usually won't bend. In some cases, we hang it over even farther for the possible install of sider's edge later.

Starter and shingles should be over at least 1/4" on eaves and rakes. 1/2" is better. Running anything flush with the drip is heading for trouble eventually. The shingles shrink in their lifetime. Seen plenty of roofs that were installed with the starter flush on the drip. No one seemed to know any better. In a few years, the shingles were 1/4" short of the edges and a nice line of metal was showing all the way around the roof. On joints, they eventually developed leaks.

The main purpose of the ODE is to get the water away from the fascia. If the shingles aren't hung over enough, the water runs back onto the face of the drip edge and onto the fascia anyways.
The other purpose of the ODE is to make a finished soffit and fascia. Can't have a metal fascia just hangin' out up there.
 

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Shingler extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The only time I don't put on drip edge is when the fascia is painted a color that no drip edge will even come close with that the home owner is happy with. In those cases we put down strips of ice and water shield on the rakes and do a 3/4 inch overhang.
I don't think it always has to match the facia, however spray paint would work though, here are a few pix of a job I did that has white facia, brown drip, and Shakewood GAF's. We spray painted the shutters to match the drip.

House Home Property Siding Roof

Home Property House Siding Roof

Roof Property Home House Cottage





(I know the flashing is kind of high on the chimney, but it was done wrong 3 times before and I didn't have much of a choice)
 

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I just would never run a house with out drip edge.

Too many people look at my work, inspect it and try to pick it apart.

I'd never give them a chance to think I'm just trying to save a few hours and $200 by not using drip edge.

It's the same reason I'd never run the Tam Valley like in the other post. Sure it will save time, but I'm not giving anyone a reason to think I'm lazy or cutting corners.
 
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