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paper hanger,painter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I am a painter, paper hanger by trade but my wife wants me to put up shelves in my basement and I nned to ask what kind of drill bit to get. The basement is painted( throughseal) limestone walls( like hard). I need to drill maybe 16 holes for screws to attach shelving brackets. I have used masonary bits in the past which worked ok for a couple holes in concrete but am thinking this is not going to work in limestone. Any tricks? Ideas? Thanks. No need to pick on the poor paper hanger:w00t:
 

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Project Superintendent
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A good quality masonry bit should do what you need to do. If you don't have a good hammer drill you need to buy or borrow one. Something a little larger than the HD homeowner stuff, something with SDS drive.
 

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Just like Mudpad said, a quality bit and hammer drill. Bosch and Hilti for the bits and drills are IMO the way to go. Having a large enough drill is very important. Do not try to use a 18V cordless with a hammer setting, you will be there all day and burn up bits.
 

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Chris, what the guys said about the bit i wont repeat, i will add that you should consider gluing and shooting, or screwing pieces of wood into the wall, then attach the brackets to the wood, Depending on the shelf layout you may be able to penetrate the hard walls only a few times, then mount all 16 screws to wood...GMOD
 

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You'll probably want to use tapcons for this....1/4" or 3/16" I think are available, use the 1/4" screws if it is going to be supporting a fair amount of weight...Use 3/16" carbide screws for the 1/4"...probably 5/32" if you use the 3/16"....You can use a regular drill for these, but you really want a hammer drill, any small hammer drill will work well. Limestone is fairly soft, yet abrasive, so you may need more than one bit to get them all done. Drill the holes a little deeper than you need, maybe just a quarter inch. The screws themselves come in either phillips or hex drive, get the hex if they don't need to be flush with the wood, they are easier to drive reliably. Slow and steady when screwing them in....You may get some that will strip out, I've found it is very hard to get 100% success with these...if this happens, move the screw a bit, or drill larger hole and put in a sleeve...you WILL need a hammer drill when drilling larger holes...Just screw them in until tight....too much and you'll either strip the hole or break the screw...You should be ok.... You could also drill for threaded rod, epoxy them in, and attach your furring strips that way...that's the best way I think, but if you don't need the furring-go with the tapcons...good luck
 

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paper hanger,painter
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thaks guys,I had the right idea but will need to buy myself a new toy( hammer drill):clap:
 

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Contractor of the Month
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Chris, what the guys said about the bit i wont repeat, i will add that you should consider gluing and shooting, or screwing pieces of wood into the wall, then attach the brackets to the wood, Depending on the shelf layout you may be able to penetrate the hard walls only a few times, then mount all 16 screws to wood...GMOD
I couldn't agree more.

Drilling a bunch of holes in stone can be pretty disruptive and slow. Once a hole is drilled in stone it is...well set in stone.

I have stone/concrete/whatever basement walls in my old house and I opted in one part to frame them and sheath them in plywood then mount shelves.

The other part of the basement I took some pieces of 2x4 and shot them vertically to the wall and screwed plywood on top.

Mounting shelves with wood screws to plywood is a lot more fun then to concrete/stone. Plus you give yourself a lot more wiggle room when mounting to wood instead of mounting directly to stone.

If you just want an excuse to get a hammer drill past the wife then by all-means, just use it to Tapcon wood to the surface, then screw the shelves on.:thumbsup:
 

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Just like Mudpad said, a quality bit and hammer drill. Bosch and Hilti for the bits and drills are IMO the way to go. Having a large enough drill is very important. Do not try to use a 18V cordless with a hammer setting, you will be there all day and burn up bits.

I set hundreds of anchors with a Makita 18V hammer drill. Concrete and granite. Never had a problem.
 

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I can't get anymore that 10 1/4" holes 1 1/2" deep drilled with a Hilti cordless roto. I know anything else would be useless.
 

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paper hanger,painter
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I have to say that i did not buy a new drill.I found an old bit and some concrete screws that I had from another project and they worked just fine. The bit is now shot but it got the 9 screws in that I ended up using, so all is well, thanks again for the input.
 

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Project Superintendent
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Well I have to say that i did not buy a new drill.I found an old bit and some concrete screws that I had from another project and they worked just fine. The bit is now shot but it got the 9 screws in that I ended up using, so all is well, thanks again for the input.
So you got the work done with minimum cost, good for you. That's the approach we all need to take to get thru these hard times.
 

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I set hundreds of anchors with a Makita 18V hammer drill. Concrete and granite. Never had a problem.
I did an entire access control system in a metal fab shop with only 18V hammer drills; nothing wrong with them except they are beyond freaking slow. That job was what told me I needed a real cordless roto.
 
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