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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I needing to drill over a hundred 1¼" holes in granite counter tops and was wondering what the best way? Wet, dry? What bit to use? How many holes will a bit drill? The granite is 1¼" thick.
 

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I needing to drill over a hundred 1¼" holes in granite counter tops and was wondering what the best way? Wet, dry? What bit to use? How many holes will a bit drill? The granite is 1¼" thick.
The granite guys i use all use angle grinders with what ever bit sizes they use. they all use a wet sponge to keep area wet. Its not the way i would do it but these guys do numerous counters a day and it seems to work. not the most neatest holes but you never see them anyway one what ever is installed.

Also if the hole needs to be dead square maybe a suction drill press.
 

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I'm thinking that Bosch should do ok...

:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also if the hole needs to be dead square maybe a suction drill press.
No these holes are for the counter top plumbing. A drill press is something I need to look into. Something that can self drill while I'm doing something else would be great. This will be production work at PW$.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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The granite guys i use all use angle grinders with what ever bit sizes they use. they all use a wet sponge to keep area wet.
The few I've seen done were with a diamond hole saw on an angle grinder, but they did it dry. No idea how many holes one's good for.

That ought to be a fun day, Randy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The few I've seen done were with a diamond hole saw on an angle grinder, but they did it dry. No idea how many holes one's good for.

That ought to be a fun day, Randy.
It's many kitchens in a high rise building. This is a first time setting the counter top. It will go right on top of the cabinets with silicon holding them down. We will cut it to length and drill the holes:no: I'm thinking it will be heavy:sad:
 

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I was actually just talking to my granite guy about it last Friday when he did a countertop for me. Angle grinder with a diamond hole saw, medium speed (on his grinder, makita) no pilot bit, no water. One vacs while the other drills. Then he puts it in a 5 gallon of water to cool off for about 5 seconds. I also have no idea on bit longevity.

Also agreeing with Tin, they have always drilled in place
 

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My granite guy uses a hole saw on angle grinder dry, and vacuum cleaner for indoor cutting.
I guess with that many holes, you have to give the blade a little time to cool off between cuts, if you want it to last.
 

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I would think the angle grinder would have to be variable speed to slow it down...

My granite installers use the same set up.. two guys one drilling, one with a squirt bottle of water, and a shop vac..
 

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My granite guy uses a hole saw on angle grinder dry, and vacuum cleaner for indoor cutting.
I guess with that many holes, you have to give the blade a little time to cool off between cuts, if you want it to last.
I keep a 5/8" lennox diamond hole saws in my drill kit for mounting TV's to granite and porcelain fire places. I've replaced it twice and it's drilled dozens of holes. But it seems to me that you either get 2 dry holes or 200 wet.;)
 
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They normally cut the holes outside before they put them on the cabinets. I'm sure they would use dry ones inside.
Mine doesn't want to drill till it is in place and well supported..

I wouldn't drill a hole next to a sink cut out, then move it around.
 

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I would think the angle grinder would have to be variable speed to slow it down...

My granite installers use the same set up.. two guys one drilling, one with a squirt bottle of water, and a shop vac..
the angle grinders they use are really 7" less than 3,000 rpm angle polisher/sanders, much lower rpm than the typical 4-5" 12,000 rpm angle grinders we are used to seeing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
So I did some research today, talked to some factors and learned a lot.
I'm been told by a few different people now that this is the brand.
I learned about how it's done and got some good pointers.
They say wet is the way to go. Dry and things get too hot and no good.
I already knew that.:rolleyes:
 

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One good bit will probably do all of them. Wet will give you greater durability and probably better speed. Self-drilling while you do something else doesn't make sense - once you've set up a template (hole cut in a piece of ply, maybe) a good bit will get right through, in under 2 minutes. Doing it freehand as in the video isn't that hard, but if your touch is wrong the bit will skitter across the stone, leaving a nice scratch.
 
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