Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was a major overhaul on this old charmer. A new roof and gutters (which we didn't do), all new windows, siding, replacing fascia and wrapping it, some custom sidelite storms, a new custom sized rear storm door, repairing and enclosing the front porch.... all by us, and then right after we finished, a new vinyl fence around the entire back yard.

I really didn't want to use vinyl on this house, but the ultra premium EVERLAST siding we like to use, just wasn't in the budget on this one. But I did use the best insulated foam backed panel I could. All in all, I think it's quite the transformation.

So this one starts from the beginning. Everything is in pretty rough shape. The house itself is rock solid. But, the exterior had been neglected for quite some time....






Lots of rotted wood that needed to be replaced....


I guess whoever did the roof, replaced (added) some knee braces to support the wide overhangs. The only problem was, they didn't space them properly and even built them incorrectly. You can see the long axis angled support 2" x 4" is actually turned the wrong way. The wide side of the 2" x 4" should be parallel to the house, but it's not. It's turned perpendicular.


They didn't want to spend the $$$ to remove and replace them, but we DID turn the long axis support the correct way before we covered them.

This awning is a story in and of itself. It was made of steel and QUITE heavy. It needed to come down for us to complete the project (the siding, not the windows), so we CAREFULLY removed it, because they wanted it back up after we were done. More on it later....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Ok.... back where we started, we've got all new siding, new trim around the windows and doors and a couple of new sidelite storms. We re-used their existing storm door as it was only a couple of years old and actually, a pretty nice one.



The rest of the changeover (again, new windows, insulated siding, window wraps, soffit and fascia covered and a whole lot of new wood rebuilding a lot of the fascia boards before wrapping them....








Remember that huge, heavy, metal awning that we took down from the second floor? Well, it was all pitted and corroded, but the home owner was determined to keep it. So, we had it sandblasted and powder coated to match the new window wraps....



Looks pretty nice huh? They thought so too. So the following spring, they called us to enclose the front porch. That's up next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Well, the first thing we had to do (I thought), was re-secure the top concrete plates to the brick knee wall. They were loose and I thought all we needed to do was secure them. Of course, you KNOW what happened.... Once we got started, we literally needed to rebuild about 30% - 40% of the knee wall. At least my customer was cool with it. It looked really good, but as soon as you would touch one of the bricks, the mortar would crumble.




Ok, the knee walls are rebuilt and the top plates secured. We are framing in the openings. They only wanted storm windows to keep the cost down. But we used really nice storms made by my favorite supplier, ProVia. Yes, along with the best doors anywhere, they also make the nicest storm window around IMHO.

Notice in this first picture, we are actually building these openings with stops. That way, the storms can be recess mounted on the stops and both sides of the wood framing wrapped with aluminum coil stock. They will look a LOT nicer that way from the outside rather than just surface mounting them IMHO. By wrapping the wood inside and out, it also makes the entire opening maintenance free, which is just what they wanted.





Once we had everything framed, we ordered the custom sized storm windows from ProVia. Here we are installed and wrapped.....




On the custom sized storm door, we had to order it as an INSWING rather than a typical outswing because of the wide overhangs. Had we put a normal OUTSWING storm door there, you wouldn't have been able to open it even half way before it hit the overhang. The problem was, the concrete floor sloped "UP" or "Down" from the main front door. So, we had to get a special sweep for the bottom of the storm door that raises up (making the door shorter) when you open it and release the plunger. Then as the door closes and the plunger is depressed against the jamb, the sweep drops down. A really cool solution to what would have been a BIG problem.



Ok, remember where we started?



And now, the old girl is all finished....



She's all dressed up for the next 50 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys.... I would have REALLY liked to rebuild all of the knee braces because they were all over the place in that almost none of them were uniform in size, nor were they spaced out evenly. It was almost as though the roofers just put them wherever they pleased with little to no regard to size and spacing.

Also, I would have rather used the EVERLAST siding we normally use, but it just didn't fit the budget. Still though, not being much of a vinyl fan, I thought it turned out pretty nice in the end.

Thanks again for the kind words.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
nice job John!,,nice save on the awning
Thanks Tom.... Yeah, it was worse up close than it looked from afar. But, after blasting and a fresh powder coat, it looked brand new.

Still, I would almost rather they had spent that $$$ on getting the knee braces fixed. I don't now why they bother me so much. I mean, they look ok now that they're covered, but it's still like a band aid on a wart.... :laughing:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,677 Posts
Thanks Tom.... Yeah, it was worse up close than it looked from afar. But, after blasting and a fresh powder coat, it looked brand new.

Still, I would almost rather they had spent that $$$ on getting the knee braces fixed. I don't now why they bother me so much. I mean, they look ok now that they're covered, but it's still like a band aid on a wart.... :laughing:
Mine had those same braces. I removed them.

Sadly, I also removed the entire rake overhang as well. It was sagging badly and with my budget it was the right call.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mine had those same braces. I removed them.

Sadly, I also removed the entire rake overhang as well. It was sagging badly and with my budget it was the right call.
That would have sure solved my storm door problem on the front of the porch! :whistling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
CompleteW&D said:
Thanks guys.... I would have REALLY liked to rebuild all of the knee braces because they were all over the place in that almost none of them were uniform in size, nor were they spaced out evenly. It was almost as though the roofers just put them wherever they pleased with little to no regard to size and spacing. Also, I would have rather used the EVERLAST siding we normally use, but it just didn't fit the budget. Still though, not being much of a vinyl fan, I thought it turned out pretty nice in the end. Thanks again for the kind words.
Good looking project. Did you remove the old siding? What R value does the new insulated siding have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Good looking project. Did you remove the old siding? What R value does the new insulated siding have?
No, didn't remove it. We built out all the windows and doors with 2 by's and sided over it. I think the Prodigy has an R-4 or maybe an R-5 rating if memory serves.

I like the fact that it's a 16'-8" panel. Far fewer seams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
CompleteW&D said:
No, didn't remove it. We built out all the windows and doors with 2 by's and sided over it. I think the Prodigy has an R-4 or maybe an R-5 rating if memory serves. I like the fact that it's a 16'-8" panel. Far fewer seams.
Long panels are a good way to go, don't use the insulated panels much maybe worth a second look. We typically get our insulator involved to drill and fill the wall cavities. We also like to use 1" foam when possible. Thanks for sharing your project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Long panels are a good way to go, don't use the insulated panels much maybe worth a second look. We typically get our insulator involved to drill and fill the wall cavities. We also like to use 1" foam when possible. Thanks for sharing your project.
They had already blown a bunch of insulation in from the inside a couple of years before we did the windows. They went in behind the base, crown and chair rail. Which was in nearly every room.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top