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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I done a few remedaition jobs with wet crawlspaces, but the latest one takes the cake-water has been coming in via a poorly placed downspout and broken foundation and subsequently the crawlspace floor is mud...along with the standing water.

standing water isn't a problem-dig a pit, drop a basin w/holes and dig channels in the crawlspace where necessary to achieve drainage.

so now the question, does anyone have a tip on drainage in such a moist condition? Even the dug out channels fall in or clog after awhile b/c of moving mud.

not sure how much exposere this question will receive here, but didn't seem as if the >excavation< forum would have been the correct spot either.
 

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A little unclear as to the question you are asking, but i would be thinking portable sump pump dropped in the low part, or hole, get the water out asap. GMOD
 

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Besides getting some air flow, you can mix in some lime with the mud and that will accelerate the drying of ths soil.
 

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Air flow is the key.
:thumbsup::thumbsup:

Two big fans, one circulating, one sucking it out. Let it run for a week at least. then vb and repair

IF you use a big old commercial exhaust fan,..ahem.. make sure there's a good grill on it, or the neighbors cat may need 10 lives:whistling
 

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Don't you have to fix the original problem by installing an adequate footing drain and storm drain around the foundation? Are you just asking for a way to temporarily get the water out? Do you have pictures? Hard to imagine the way you describe it, sump pump and a shovel?
 

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Shop vac all the water that you can't get with the sump pump. Most pumps will leave an inch or more. Shop vac will get it all.

Then the fans to dry it out the rest of the way.
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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Don't you have to fix the original problem by installing an adequate footing drain and storm drain around the foundation?

That made me remember a job I had long ago, same problem h20 in the crawl space but it was the grade that was the culprit. They didn't want to change the whole front yard so I hand mixed concrete (it wasn't big enough to justify a pump truck) and made a floor with a sump. Yeah it wasn't the best solution but they loved it, the cats couldn't couldn't use it for a kitty box anymore! :laughing:

www.phbconstruction.com
 

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You have the answers here for a temporary remedy- now the a permanent solution must be figured out. Perhaps dig a trench around the whole foundation with perforated pipe & stone, etc, in the trench & all flowin down to a "Drywell" ..........................

P.S.- a thrash pump works well in pumping out water with solids "Mud"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
the present layers of VB have held water in-underneath the VB it's 2-3" of mud where the puddles of water are located.

the fan idea is great-I already have one pulling air out but additional fans are needed.

the commercial property doesn't want to realllly fix it, just correct the VB and fallen insulation. I always point out leaks and other issues, but not sure they get fixed. I've provided a proposal long ago for a drainage system to carry the water away from the foundation; you know how budgets work?
 

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Sluggin away
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Not fix the problem?

If they don't want the problem fixed I would get the heck out of there! MOLD is not a fun liability issue and you could be asking for it! Get a remediation company to rent you some good LGR dehumidifiers and a good air scrubber and get this place drying asap. Create a strong negative air pressure chamber to control the humidity and to prevent the air space above from being contaminated and get this drying. Remove the excess moisture and let the machines dry it out. Depending on the size of the crawl space it should take a week or so...good luck. Lots of air movers-approx 1 every 10 feet. ps be sure to be careful of carbon monoxide poisoning by the negative pressure from the furnace or appliances or whatever is above the crawlspace (hvac contractor recommended to help)..
Looks fun to me! :eek:
 

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The Duke
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the present layers of VB have held water in-underneath the VB it's 2-3" of mud where the puddles of water are located.

the fan idea is great-I already have one pulling air out but additional fans are needed.

the commercial property doesn't want to realllly fix it, just correct the VB and fallen insulation. I always point out leaks and other issues, but not sure they get fixed. I've provided a proposal long ago for a drainage system to carry the water away from the foundation; you know how budgets work?
baby poop! mmmm. Can't really add more than what others told you. Dry it with fans or dehumidifiers, fix the source. I don't think you'll need to bring in anything once the problem is fixed. It might be messy now, but after it dries it should be fine. Black plastic.

Years ago in a big development I was working in, at the end of phase 2, phase 3 was above the drainage of the home we were building. Never saw it until HO saw water coming out of the crawl vents. Opened up the cover and swimming pool, probably 3 feet deep of water. Not good. Mushrooms growing on the insulation, mold....
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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. Opened up the cover and swimming pool, probably 3 feet deep of water. Not good. Mushrooms growing on the insulation, mold....[/quote

Stock it with blue gill and go fishing everyday! Mushrooms are the icing on the cake, I could laugh all day while I fished. :laughing:

Where is phase three I might move in.

www.phbconstruction.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Not to mention structural damage that follows prolonged exposure to moisture.
I had no knowledge of the issues w/ high moisture levels on wood (floor trusses in this case) before working on one of these crawlspaces before. Portions of the wood looked as if it had been put into a vacuum and the surface collapsed around the grain. The detail was small but consistant in areas. I wondered how much the integrity/strength of the trusses was decreased by.
 

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I had no knowledge of the issues w/ high moisture levels on wood (floor trusses in this case) before working on one of these crawlspaces before. Portions of the wood looked as if it had been put into a vacuum and the surface collapsed around the grain. The detail was small but consistant in areas. I wondered how much the integrity/strength of the trusses was decreased by.
That doesn't sound like moisture damage, that sounds like old wood. Rot and mold are the only things caused my moisture damage as far as I know. My general rule is if you can scrape off more than a quarter of an inch, then replace it. But it's subjective, you have to use your own judgement. But I would agree with the other posters, that if the owner doesn't want to fix it the proper way, meaning redo the drainage system and direct water away from the house, then walk away. I wouldn't just stick a pump in there and call it good, that's a temporary solution, not a permanent. I wouldn't just drill a hole in the floor either, where's the water going to go? I almost thought that was a joke before. Mold lawsuits aren't uncommon, a builder I worked for a few years ago got sued millions over mold issues. If you even think about doing a sub-standard fix, consult an attorney first.
 
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