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Contractor
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are you using protection while sanding?

TOH had an episode last year (Brownstone house) where they fixed a couple of old doors (misplaced knobs if I recall).

I tried a cool trick for making it easier to scrape old paint off window latches-soak the part in boiling water for a short time-then pull out while hot and scrape the paint :)
 

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I like Green things
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
are you using protection while sanding?

TOH had an episode last year (Brownstone house) where they fixed a couple of old doors (misplaced knobs if I recall).

I tried a cool trick for making it easier to scrape old paint off window latches-soak the part in boiling water for a short time-then pull out while hot and scrape the paint :)

I have an old crock pot I use to get paint off of old harware, works like a champ.

I had to use chemical stripper to make a dent in these doors, then I used my Festool dust extractor and their sanders. Minimal dust is created using their set-up.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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They are just recessed on the other side, right. No bevel. I've actually never made on that was a double panel like that. Usually it is a 3 or 4 panel door. The ones I see are usually in the 1700's period and instead of being a square profile on the stiles and rails there is a bead.

How are you stripping them, Rotex? Chemicals would be easier, Peel and strip, or something like that is especially good for doors that have lots of layers of paint on them.
 

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Curmudgeon
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Okay, so I can be wrong again today....
walnut panels?
Rails and stiles, depends on which pic
and what color.....:laughing:
Leo?
 

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I like Green things
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
They are just recessed on the other side, right. No bevel. I've actually never made on that was a double panel like that. Usually it is a 3 or 4 panel door. The ones I see are usually in the 1700's period and instead of being a square profile on the stiles and rails there is a bead.

How are you stripping them, Rotex? Chemicals would be easier, Peel and strip, or something like that is especially good for doors that have lots of layers of paint on them.
There is a slight bevel on the rails and styles and on the panel itself.

Through tennons and pegged.

I had to use chemicals to get a good start. The problem I have with chemical strippers is the they only go through similar materials, once it hits a layer of paint that is different, the stripper stops working.

There is latex, oil, lead, and probably milk paint on those as well.

Once I get the paint down so far I use my Rotex, Deltex and ets 125.
I ended up taking the first one apart to get all the paint out of the nooks and cranny's. Then I put it back together with new pins.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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They like there greens. Surprised about the mustard yellow though. It was always a very common color. Guess the lady of the house didn't like yellow.
 

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Contractor
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It was close between a medium green and pink, mustard yellow was the third place finisher!!
after an interesting visit to George Washington's Mount Vernon estate, the tour guide explained how the 'visible' color wasn't the real color due to fading. Using some sort of fancy machine (spectra analazer maybe???) they were able to determine the real color-possibly by testing the inside of the paint chip (versus the outside-faded portion of the paint chip).

So, what color are doors-really?:whistling
 
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