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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how do you guys go about doing work for your friends and family. Do you charge them what you would charge other clients, or do you go below your regular estimating price to give them a "good deal"?

If so, how low do you guys go?

Ive been having trouble with this lately, my girlfriend's aunt wants me to paint the interior of her home, however i feel weird charging her my regular rate, i begin to think that she might think its too much.
 

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This is bad juju! Do it for free on your off time and accept whatever is offered. Great Aunt Mable still remembers when bread was 3 cents a loaf.
 

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When I do jobs for friends and family I usually don't charge overhead and never markup materials or add in profit. But my family is usually more than willing to pay my labor and for the great discount we get on materials.

I am doing a few benches and chairs for my girlfriends boss, probable worth about $75-$100. I'm only charging him $20 plus the cost of the few cans of spray paint it will take.

I almost always tell them what I would have charged them if I didn't know them.
 

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I would say don't charge if there within 2 degrees or seperation. Then increase your discounts from that point on.

Personally I would pay the going rate to faimly plus some. I'd just be glad I am paying a faimly member.
 

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Generally, I avoid it.
Rule of thumb is that if it's for family, it's a gimme. After all, didn't they help you out with that flat tire 10 yrs. ago? etc., etc. It's now 20 yrs. later and they want their house painted. Now you wished that you called AAA for that tire repair.
IMHO, working for family and friends is the absolute worst.
 

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I would say charge your girlfriend's aunt darned close to what you would charge anybody else. Encourage her to get one or two other estimates so that she knows you aren't overcharging. If the job goes well and you like her I'm sure you will find countless other smaller things that you can help her out with that will have value to her and not cost you so much. Painting her front door free of charge is a favor, working for a week repainting an interior at hundreds less than you would usually earn is a gift that may or may not be appreciated. I could go on, but that was my $.02 worth. ; )

hack
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
so getting paid for your labor, and making profit isn't the same thing?
i always thought that what you made after paying for overhead and materials and all other expenses was your profit and/or what you got paid for your labor.
 

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If they want me to 'help' them, meaning they are going to bust some ass on the project, get dirty, bash a thumb, get some splinters, get sweaty, then it is a freebie. If they want to sit back and live thier life while I bust ass, then normal rates or maybe double. :D
 

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saucedo80 said:
so getting paid for your labor, and making profit isn't the same thing?
i always thought that what you made after paying for overhead and materials and all other expenses was your profit and/or what you got paid for your labor.
It could be, it depends on if you have others working for you and of course if you are marking up materials. Generally your salary should be better than what you would be paid if you shut down and worked for a competitor and your profit should be the benefit to owning your own company and not working for somebody else.
 

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saucedo80 said:
so getting paid for your labor, and making profit isn't the same thing?
i always thought that what you made after paying for overhead and materials and all other expenses was your profit and/or what you got paid for your labor.

How I see it is labor is the compensation for your valuable time and knowladge as a profesional. You own the business also and, generaly, business' turn a profit, usually 2-10% for competative bidding. I find it very dificult to calculate this, given all the variables, but, like you, I am new to contracting and business in general.
 

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saucedo80 said:
so getting paid for your labor, and making profit isn't the same thing?
i always thought that what you made after paying for overhead and materials and all other expenses was your profit and/or what you got paid for your labor.
I dont think that getting paid for your labor and making profit is the same thing, except for a sole proprietorship at tax preparation time. I look at it more as:

Profit= Price - Cost of Labor (what you could make working for someone else for the same amt. of hours plus 7.5% or the hourly wage you would pay someone else plus 7.5%) - Cost of Materials - % of Overhead attributable to job.
 

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Charge what you're worth -- family, friends, everyone. They may get irate for the moment, but when they find out what the going rate is or hire someone else for less and get screwed, they'll reconsider their opinion of you. And if you do get the job, you won't resent them and you'll probably do better work for them than you would for someone else who paid the same price. And if your girlfriend insists you do discount work for her aunt, imagine what it's going to be like down the road.

saucedo80 said:
how do you guys go about doing work for your friends and family. Do you charge them what you would charge other clients, or do you go below your regular estimating price to give them a "good deal"?

If so, how low do you guys go?

Ive been having trouble with this lately, my girlfriend's aunt wants me to paint the interior of her home, however i feel weird charging her my regular rate, i begin to think that she might think its too much.
 
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