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I really hate doing electrical because I don't always know the answer. So hopefully somebody can help me on this one.

One of my customers asked me to remove the GFI outlet from the garage because it falses (turns off) to often. He stated that he hired an electrician last year to repair the GFI and the electrician changed it with a new one. However, the GFI continues to false. He stated the GFI falses about once a week when he uses his power tools in the garage. So he is so frustrated with the GFI that he wants it totally removed. (Currently he is running an extension cord from the inside of the house to avoid the GFI outlet in the garage.)

My question is why is there a GFI in the garage anyway? I understand there is a GFI in the restroom because drop hair dryers in the water which can electrocute. However, the garage is a mystery to me.

I appreciate it if you are not going to help me, don't even bother posting on my thread. Now if you can help me, then please post. My customer is waiting for my response. I told him that I would remove the GFI outlet after I got some consultation from my electrician buddy. (Which is you guys of coarse.) If nobody can answer me, the I assume that GFI is not necessary in the garage.

thanks.....
 

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GFI in Garage

Handyman99 - I want to try and help you so we can both be offline when the electricians wake up and see that plumbers and generals are messing with their GFI's.

Your last point first: I wouldn't assume that just because no-one at CT says otherwise that it's OK to take out a GFI!

Then your first point - why have a GFI in a garage? Not a bad question, and I suspect you"re looking for something more than "required by code".
Bare concrete = ground. Tile on a slab and metal pumbing fixtures (like in a wet kitchen, bath and laundry) are even more potentially dangerous, but same principle in a garage.

Won"t be surpised one day to see GFI required everywhere .

So far, the sparkies are eyeing me cautiously; now I'm getting into their territory, and that can be more dangerous than dropping my hairdryer in the tub.

Before you get yourself into real trouble,
1. try using a 20amp GFI, if the wiring/breaker are 20amp.
2. check if there's a GFI "up-stream" on this same circuit.
3. make sure it isn't a split circuit with a common neutral.
4. ask your electrician to stop messing with your pipes.

It's been fun, but I gotta get out of here.
 

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I really hate doing electrical because I don't always know the answer. So hopefully somebody can help me on this one.

One of my customers asked me to remove the GFI outlet from the garage because it falses (turns off) to often. He stated that he hired an electrician last year to repair the GFI and the electrician changed it with a new one. However, the GFI continues to false. He stated the GFI falses about once a week when he uses his power tools in the garage. So he is so frustrated with the GFI that he wants it totally removed. (Currently he is running an extension cord from the inside of the house to avoid the GFI outlet in the garage.)

My question is why is there a GFI in the garage anyway? I understand there is a GFI in the restroom because drop hair dryers in the water which can electrocute. However, the garage is a mystery to me.

I appreciate it if you are not going to help me, don't even bother posting on my thread. Now if you can help me, then please post. My customer is waiting for my response. I told him that I would remove the GFI outlet after I got some consultation from my electrician buddy. (Which is you guys of coarse.) If nobody can answer me, the I assume that GFI is not necessary in the garage.

thanks.....
Actually, you're scaring me me. Asking questions is OK. But I think you're in a little over your head. Please get a licensed electrician. Now.
 

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Yeah, I just found his other post. I'm feeling pretty stupid right now. Those guys are going to find this thread, and come tomorrow they"ll be on me. Last time I try to help someone late at night.

BTW, Handyman, you gotta admit, I was nice to you, right?
 

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Shoot, I pee in my garage, that makes it a bathroom so it does need a gfi. If I'm working at your house you darn well better have a gfi in the garage because sooner or latter I'll have to pee. In your garage.
 

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Pompass Ass
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I really hate doing electrical because I don't always know the answer. So hopefully somebody can help me on this one.

One of my customers asked me to remove the GFI outlet from the garage because it falses (turns off) to often. He stated that he hired an electrician last year to repair the GFI and the electrician changed it with a new one. However, the GFI continues to false. He stated the GFI falses about once a week when he uses his power tools in the garage. So he is so frustrated with the GFI that he wants it totally removed. (Currently he is running an extension cord from the inside of the house to avoid the GFI outlet in the garage.)

My question is why is there a GFI in the garage anyway? I understand there is a GFI in the restroom because drop hair dryers in the water which can electrocute. However, the garage is a mystery to me.

I appreciate it if you are not going to help me, don't even bother posting on my thread. Now if you can help me, then please post. My customer is waiting for my response. I told him that I would remove the GFI outlet after I got some consultation from my electrician buddy. (Which is you guys of coarse.) If nobody can answer me, the I assume that GFI is not necessary in the garage.

thanks.....
Do yourself and your client a favor and tell them to hire someone who knows what they are doing, in this case a Licensed Electrician.

You obviously have no business touching electrical because you have no clue what you are doing and when you do electrical work for a client, not only should you know what you are doing, but you should be licensed as well.
 

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Burritos
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Sigh...

Since the GFCI has been replaced already, it is probably one of the HO tools that has gone bad. It seems like he trips the GFCI with regular interval, so whatever he is using when the outlet pops needs to be replaced.
 

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Thom
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handyman, you seem to do a lot of electrical work. Why not just buy yourself a code book and the related hand book? Oftentimes what seem like simple questions to you are not so simple. There are a variety of things that can affect the answer that you have not considered.

Doing this without a clear understanding of all the parts really is dangerous. It may take time, even several years, before some of the problems manifest themselves as fires or dead customers. It really is better to learn what you are doing here.

In this case, the simple answer is in the code book. The guys who write the code books consider a whole lot of stuff when writing it. They don't tell us all that stuff, just the rules. So, we do it because code requires it.

Always remember, the statute of limitations on code violations starts running when the building owner becomes aware of the violation. What that really means is you are legally responsible for all the work you've done until your estate has been settled.
 
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I will say this again, but do you have insurance? How will you feel if one of your "shortcuts" gets someone hurt, or even killed? Electrical shocks have been fatal.....and if their home burns down, do you have enough insurance to cover the bill? How about a fatal fire?

Why not stick to handyman stuff and leave electrical work for electricians?
 

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I'm finishing my basement. Do I really need a vapor barrier? That's a big waste of money if you ask me so screw it I'm not putting one in.

I hate the look of suspended ceilings too so up goes the sheetrock.

Plumbing shutoff valves? Waste of time. All they do is open up the possibility of someone shutting them off and then I'll have no running water.

Vapor barriers, drop ceilings, and shutoff valves.... who needs them?
 

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Pompass Ass
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I will say this again, but do you have insurance? How will you feel if one of your "shortcuts" gets someone hurt, or even killed? Electrical shocks have been fatal.....and if their home burns down, do you have enough insurance to cover the bill? How about a fatal fire?

Why not stick to handyman stuff and leave electrical work for electricians?
I don't think his hack insurance will cover that, if I work outside of the scope of my licenses and what I have listed on my insurance application, they can deny coverage.

When this hacks customer's kid dies because they plugged in an extension cord into a formerly protected GFCI outlet and drop it in the kiddy pool and die, how is insurance going to compensate the parents who lost their kid?

What is the handyhackman going to do about it?
 

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The painfully obvious is not so obvious to Handyman99.




The reason the GFI trips is because it is doing it's job protecting people.



Now you want to remove that protection. Instead of finding the problem, you want to cover it up. For money.

.
 
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Sparky, I would think your neck is
pretty sore by now, cause someone
has been jerking your chain. :shifty:
 
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