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I rarely take anything, I have at least 2 of everything. As a mainly one man show if I'm doing a whole remodel or even smaller I'll be damned if I load & unload daily.

Couple years ago doing an unoccupied whole house remodel I pull up one morning and the HO left the garage door open. Nothing missing but now I have a snake in the house.

And my 40 footer was cut up and thrown in the dumpster. I don't miss it but it is more likable than a 60 footer.
 

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Depend on the area I am in. Lots of times will take my trailer home for the weekend though mainly because might have work at home to do.
I like to take my trailer home on weekends as I feel it doesn’t need to be taking up driveway space if I’m not there for a few days.

I leave lots on interior jobs because they are always occupied. Ladders are the only thing I leave outside but all stacked neat in one place.
 

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Luckily, I've moved into a position where everything I need fits in a backpack. The exception is my folding table and chair. If I'm going to be on the same job more than a day (rare), those get stashed inside a rooftop unit or the mechanical contractor's trailer.
 

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My super or foreman, or my brother or me has to set up the 40. My dad did it by himself 2 years ago at the plant, climbed it and tied it off for the hands.
 

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If I was a solo operator I might think different. I've never worked alone, always had a crew whether I was running one for some one else or my crew since I was 19. Always had apprentices or laborers to clean up and roll up. When I was on my dad's crew in high school I was expected to show up early, roll out Air compressor, hoses, cords, set up saw, uncover materials.

As the crew lead for other builders or myself I have always disconnected my hose and put my gun and bags up, the low man rolls up , closes up saw while i made a quick list on a block of wood or a note pad for tomorrow's chit, and then helped them load up, cover materials etc if anything was left to do

When I built my house I'd be going to work on the house at 330, we had 2 houses and 3 remodels I was running so couldn't be there all day, I'd roll up at 10 pm or so and go home. Thst was the worst ****ing jobsite iver ever been associated with. Was hard to find the energy to do anything, I left my box trailer and just tossed my chit in there and opened a beer and drove the mile to my house and slammed the plate my wife left me in the oven and went to sleep 😆 Place was a wreck without laborers

I clean jobs and move, organize materials more now than I did when I was wearing bags. Nothing I had less respect for than a "Big boss" who wouldn't get his hands dirty or do the low tasks. It's different when your the quarterback running the crew all day and producing work than rolling up in a 80k truck and your sunglasses fogging out because they are so cold from that AC or pulling up with a toasty warm ass from the heated seats in the winter and telling people do this and do that and hurry about it and then getting in the truck and leave. Pretty easy to do with 10 houses going and being in the office a lot. I try and work on atleast two jobs a week, lately with my oldest kid, doing menial tasks. Doesnt do to take the nice work either. Although I did get to string line the soffit angle on a bastard hip the other day and flatten the sub fascia before the installed, and I cut the pattern for some irregular rafters the other day. Every now and again it's OK 👍
 

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The Dude
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I used to run around cleaning up on roofing jobs when I had time, and needed the workout. A lot of the details that the guys were just too worn out to do. The most irritating parts when they just want to go home. Save that energy for putting shingles on gents!
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Well, I've been reflecting a lot on why I currently leave tools on jobs. Basically cause I've historically been short handed. I had to demob today to run over and do a small job, so I decided to take everything but a couple ladders and the trash cans. Realized we bring in loads of stuff that doesn't even get used. So I'm going to refactor the tools so a "journeyman" can grab his tote or whatever and start working. Laborer can haul all the other junk in. I sorta always wanted it this way but never had consistent manpower to make the daily lumping realistic.
 

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Focusing on solutions.
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Hell yeah I leave tools on the job. Nobody wants to steal a floor sander, too hard a work & too much dust to breath. :)

Seriously, we work primarily in occupied homes & are mostly the only trades on the job, so yeah, I don't worry about rolling up every night. Course most of the time, we're only there for a few days most of the time.
 

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I'd rather rent a boom lift than fork around with a 40 footer.
I agree, and do. However there is always that place I can not get a lift in. This summer we were on an exterior painting job that I finally got around to. From when I looked at it to actually doing the job the home owner had installed an in ground pool. Out came the 40 footer. Lol.
 
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