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Wearer of Hats
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a client recently purchased a house, and the paint on the cabinets started peeling whenever a fingernail or anything touched it, however otherwise it looks alright. After using denatured alcohol, I discovered that the top layer was latex, but the bottom layer was glossy oil base and no primer was used as I can see from the paint coming up with nothing on it and the glossy oil is very evident underneath.

The paint isn't bubbling, but rather it's simply not adhering well enough to stop contact tearing.

So before I try to removed all of the latex, prime and repaint, I'm going to test an area by simply going over the latex with a new primer and then recoating with latex and see how it holds up. The theory is that the primer layer will help prevent further tearing from contact and that the adhesion underneath will be good enough to hold up.

Has anyone tried this and if so, how were the results? Any specific product that works well for this? If not, I'm going to test an area for science and let you know how it turns out.

Also, if this test fails (which I'm feeling there is a good chance) is there a good stripper that will strip only the latex and leave the oil base. I figure the oil won't come off easily no matter what I do, versus the latex which is already coming off mechanically.
 

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Doesn't matter what you put over it, the adhesion isn't there between the latex and oil. It may indeed hold up longer by going over it with something very durable, not primer but it will still pop off.

I don't know off any stripper that will only strip latex. You might be able to get a weak stripper, water base, leave it on long enough to remove the latex with minimal harm to to the oil.

Either way you're gonna have do some sanding and prep to the oil to get anything to adhere.
 

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30 year novice
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Avenge nailed it, a durable coat on top the one that is not adhering is only prolonging the agony. Eventually you will start to see bubbles where it's letting go. I would price out new poplar doors and start from scratch. Unless they're cherry or another pricey wood stripping and then re finishing will be more costly IMO
 

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I'm in the same boat with a ceiling. I'm just going for it. Cabinets take a lot more abuse. If yours is peeling like my ceiling, you probably don't need any chemicals. Just peel it off. Also check out Motsenbocker's latex paint remover from Home Depot. It turns latex into warm mozzarella. I've never used it on such a large area, though. SW pro classic makes a nice hard shell. I think if you don't strip it, your best shot is to put armor on it.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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I have a crazy idea.
How about Goof-Off applied with 0000 steel wool to dissolve the latex enough to expose the oil? The fine scratches may supply adequate adhesion for a primer.
Goof-Off won't lift the paint like a stripper will but will dissolve it. Wipe it dry with paper towels and allow to dry.
Faster and not as messy as stripping.
Just a thought....
 
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This space for lease
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A day sanding the latex off will be a day well spent. Otherwise you aren't doing the homeowner any favors. The latex will be softer than the alkyd so it should sand pretty well. Do you have cabinet scrapers?
 

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If you can get your hands on some Red Lye mix it in a five with hot water wear rubber gloves use a sponge wipe it on let it sit about 5 minutes do this a couple times, you'll see the latex will skin an should be able to use a scrubby pad, then after you get latex paint off let them dry then sand with 220 then paint you should be good:thumbsup:
Oh another thing about Red Lye if your painter whites have a lot of caulk and paint on them take a 5 fill 3/4 with Hot water add about a half a cup of Red Lye then put your pants in the bucket let it soak for about 45 minutes before you wash them they will come out of the dryer with a lot of paint and caulk removed from your pants just make sure the zipper is metal if it's plastic the zipper will melt.
 

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So a client recently purchased a house, and the paint on the cabinets started peeling whenever a fingernail or anything touched it, however otherwise it looks alright. After using denatured alcohol, I discovered that the top layer was latex, but the bottom layer was glossy oil base and no primer was used as I can see from the paint coming up with nothing on it and the glossy oil is very evident underneath.

The paint isn't bubbling, but rather it's simply not adhering well enough to stop contact tearing.

So before I try to removed all of the latex, prime and repaint, I'm going to test an area by simply going over the latex with a new primer and then recoating with latex and see how it holds up. The theory is that the primer layer will help prevent further tearing from contact and that the adhesion underneath will be good enough to hold up.

Has anyone tried this and if so, how were the results? Any specific product that works well for this? If not, I'm going to test an area for science and let you know how it turns out.

Also, if this test fails (which I'm feeling there is a good chance) is there a good stripper that will strip only the latex and leave the oil base. I figure the oil won't come off easily no matter what I do, versus the latex which is already coming off mechanically.
Just the doors and frames, or did they make the insides a headache, too? Just curious.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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So a client recently purchased a house, and the paint on the cabinets started peeling whenever a fingernail or anything touched it, however otherwise it looks alright. After using denatured alcohol, I discovered that the top layer was latex, but the bottom layer was glossy oil base and no primer was used as I can see from the paint coming up with nothing on it and the glossy oil is very evident underneath.

The paint isn't bubbling, but rather it's simply not adhering well enough to stop contact tearing.

So before I try to removed all of the latex, prime and repaint, I'm going to test an area by simply going over the latex with a new primer and then recoating with latex and see how it holds up. The theory is that the primer layer will help prevent further tearing from contact and that the adhesion underneath will be good enough to hold up.

Has anyone tried this and if so, how were the results? Any specific product that works well for this? If not, I'm going to test an area for science and let you know how it turns out.

Also, if this test fails (which I'm feeling there is a good chance) is there a good stripper that will strip only the latex and leave the oil base. I figure the oil won't come off easily no matter what I do, versus the latex which is already coming off mechanically.
The bond between the new and old coat is poor. Putting another coat on top of a poorly bonded coat will result in the exact same problem.
 

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Trailer park boy
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I have a crazy idea.
How about Goof-Off applied with 0000 steel wool to dissolve the latex enough to expose the oil? The fine scratches may supply adequate adhesion for a primer.
Goof-Off won't lift the paint like a stripper will but will dissolve it. Wipe it dry with paper towels and allow to dry.
Faster and not as messy as stripping.
Just a thought....
As a bonus, you won't need any beer after doing this.:thumbup:
 

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Inform the customer that the longest lasting solution is to remove all the paint at great cost. However, you could inform the customer and get approval for an alternative that's much cheaper but not as durable. That solution is to coat all the surfaces with pigmented shellac. This will act as a "turtle shell" much like a coat of wax on a car. Top coat it with the hardest enamel paint you can find.

I've performed such work using the turtle coat method, but I was sure to explain that to the customer beforehand. It worked out quite well actually, all things considered.
 

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This space for lease
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Inform the customer that the longest lasting solution is to remove all the paint at great cost. However, you could inform the customer and get approval for an alternative that's much cheaper but not as durable. That solution is to coat all the surfaces with pigmented shellac. This will act as a "turtle shell" much like a coat of wax on a car. Top coat it with the hardest enamel paint you can find.

I've performed such work using the turtle coat method, but I was sure to explain that to the customer beforehand. It worked out quite well actually, all things considered.
I'm skeptical about that working for any length of time. Also, knowing human nature like I do, if you do something substandard with their permission, when it goes wrong they will say "you should have known better, you're the professional". And they'd be right. I've walked off a few jobs rather than do it their way.
 

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I'm skeptical about that working for any length of time. Also, knowing human nature like I do, if you do something substandard with their permission, when it goes wrong they will say "you should have known better, you're the professional". And they'd be right. I've walked off a few jobs rather than do it their way.
That's what contracts are for.
 
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