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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any idea how to take care of an old dirty shower? This lady says she's tried cleaning it with CLR, ammonia, bleach, everything, nothing will clean it. It would be a waste to replace the whole shower only because it's dirty. Is there a way to paint over it, or cover it?

 

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paper hanger,painter
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Paint over it? Now there is a great idea:rolleyes: Behr premium plus to the rescue.:w00t:

Here is a novel idea, YOU clean it!
Soft scrub,Krud Cutter,Scrubbing bubbles, etc,etc,etc and a little elbow grease will do it.The little old lady did not try hard enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol, no not Behr. This old lady is pretty tough, I saw her outside landscaping carrying some huge boulders around that most guys couldn't carry. I might try cleaning it for her, but I don't know if I'll end up spinning my wheels, they look like stains.
 

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Sean
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Is that a fiberglass or acrylic base? Did she use comet or something else rough on it - then it is scratched up big time & will need to be redone or replaced

I know this place sells a fiberglass cleaner used for boats www.jamestowndistributors.com - you might have a source locally though that you can use

You could also try getting it steam cleaned
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's a shower from the 70's, so I'm guessing it's acrylic.

That's kind of what I was thinking Ebbo, I might see if I can find someone local who does that to give her a bid.
 

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I have had good luck with barkeepers friend. comes in a can like comet but is safe enough to use on glass. You wouldn't believe what comes off with that stuff. You can get it at the local HD or Lowes. for about 2 bucks it is worth a shot.
 

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If that's a fiberglass base, the hard scrubbing is prolly taking off the finish. Looks like dirt, but the more you scrub the worse it gets. Refinish or replace.
 

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bathroom guru
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Almost looks like cultured marble walls - which would mean a cultured marble base. If the case - they can be a PITA to get the stains out of.

Most of the time the roughen up the top coat (which is like gel coat) to provide anti-slip protection. Unfortunately, it also leaves the surface "open" and stains can get in.

If you are looking at the refinishing option, just be aware it is not going to last forever. Depending on the usage, the materials used, and the guy doing the job, a typical reglazing job should last 5-10 years. Your customer will not be able to use any of the aforementioned cleansers on the reglazed base.
 

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Test lacquer thinner on a small spot and if it doesn't harm the surface go over the rest of the shower with it. Lacquer thinner is the best stuff I've used for bringing off stains, dirt, paint, etc.
 

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Yes you can refinish it. I do this for a living. It is sprayed with a HVLP compressor using aerospace epoxy paints you get from Midwest or Napco. I've done hundreds of tubs and fiberglass surrounds and tile with it.
How well does the paint hold up in situations like that over time? The painted showers/tubs and sinks (usually kitchen) that I've come across have failures around the drains within a few years. Though, you may be using better coatings than the ones I've seen.
 

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bathroom guru
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How well does the paint hold up in situations like that over time? The painted showers/tubs and sinks (usually kitchen) that I've come across have failures around the drains within a few years. Though, you may be using better coatings than the ones I've seen.

No reglazing material is going to last the same as an original finish. It is dependant on 2 things - the quality of the material and the workmanship. You could use the best material on the planet, but, if not prepped and applied properly, you're gonna have problems
 

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No reglazing material is going to last the same as an original finish. It is dependant on 2 things - the quality of the material and the workmanship. You could use the best material on the planet, but, if not prepped and applied properly, you're gonna have problems
I agree. I've never done it on any of my jobs, although I've been asked and have been able to talk them in to installing a new product. I'm actually going to look at a bathroom Monday and the client mentioned something about painting the tile, but we'll see. If I did that, I'd rather have it done in an area that is not heavily used.
 

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I agree. I've never done it on any of my jobs, although I've been asked and have been able to talk them in to installing a new product. I'm actually going to look at a bathroom Monday and the client mentioned something about painting the tile, but we'll see. If I did that, I'd rather have it done in an area that is not heavily used.
Not that I am going to backtrack on my earlier post, but, I will say that I am not totally against reglazing - I just hate when reglazing companies say their sh*t is going to last for the long haul.

Tile reglazing will work well - even in a wet area (tub surround - not shower) - as it does not get the abuse a tub does - however, normally if you are doing the tile, you are doing the tub.

The only fixtures I like to see reglazed are antique clawfoot tubs and sinks - just forget about doing old farmhouse kitchen sinks or any kitchen sink for that matter!
 
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