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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I long standing customer picked this up and wants to use it in conjunction with a table. She wants me to split the pew on a 45 and put it back together.

I do love a challenge but I'm a little at a loss....the seat is curved, the back is curved. Their isn't anything flat to go off of, I'm thinking huge band saw but where..... What other options do I have?

-matt Bumper Automotive exterior Furniture Table Hardwood


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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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That's simple....

 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Could you fabricate a negative of the curve to make it a square/ plumb plain and then cut the miter with a track saw?

I see that being easier and more accurate that cutting by hand...
Cutting it from the backside using this method sounds like it could work. It would take 2 passes for each cut. the seat cut >> the blade would be straight and the back cut >> the blade would be at a 45.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
She wants me to split the bench in half so it can fit into a corner and put a round table against it. I thought about the laser and shooting a line onto it but it is oak, the pullssaw would take forever though effective.

There are just so many variables to take into sccount

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It's all about laying out the line correctly and using a Sharp Quality handsaw to make the cut. You may also need to make a jig to provide your saw (and eye) a reference so you can maintain the correct angle.

Favor 45 degrees plus (always error to the side you can easily correct)

It's old school and not a quick cut and charge accordingly labor/risk factor.

I'd probably cut the bench directly in half first.

Jig saw comes to mind, but a handsaw will make the cut just fine with better control.
 

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The last line seems like an accurate way to get the angle you want while also allowing you to easily adjust.

But, I also think you need to make it clear that there is the possibility of damaging the seat and who would be responsible for that? It doesn't look like there's another one easily available.

I think once you establish the line, any common method of cutting will need to be tweaked with a planer and/or sander.

I did a job where I used carbon paper to get my joint as tight as possible. I put the pieces together with a piece of carbon paper in between and used the paper to mark where adjustment was needed.
 

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What about putting a piece of tape along the cut line.
Shoot a line with a laser where you need to cut and transfer onto the tape.
Cut the bench as needed with the best tool for that part of the bench: circ saw, jigsaw, handsaw, etc. And fine tune the miter with some light sanding until prefect?

The hangsaw may be the best option: easily controllable, quickly correctable, and very sharp. There are some very good Japanese saws available: very sharp and very thin kerf.
 

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Board Shortener
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Doing do would great shorten the bench as you would have to go back and cut an angle in each half, basically cutting a large triangle out of each half.
??

You're still making the same 2 cuts that would be made if the bench was left in one piece. In order to make it a corner bench, a large triangle needs to be cut out (90* section at 45* to the back). You might lose an extra saw kerf, but it might be easier to work with the shorter sections.
 

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How about hand sawing the 45.

Then cleaning up the miter with a router and a jig. Route both edges at once layed out at 45 and a appropriate gap given the size of the flush bit making a perfect fit. Yes you would have to make the surface flat with a neg curve as mentioned. But it would save a lot of time "tweaking" the joint.

For the seat I'm talking.

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/jointer-alternative/

For the back rest, don't have a good option. A corner lock router bit works well for 3/4 board but I'm assuming the rest is way thicker than that.
 
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