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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 2006 Ford E-150 with 66,000 miles on her. So I was pulling out of my driveway Thursday morning and turn out to the right and hear/feel this bang noise form the rear, like I drove over a large stone , pinched it , and it skipped off......
So I get out and look, nothing there.......:blink: I get back in and continue on. I make a left turn and I am hearing/feeling it again...!!!
When I drove straight there was no problem but as soon as I made a turn this noise, and jolt came from the back end.
So I went to the dealer I bought it from and the owner wanted to get in and take it for a ride. He gets in , puts it in reverse, turning to the left,went about 10' and the whole ass end of the van jerks.............
He tells me he has to keep the van and gets me a ride home from one of his sales reps. Calls me Friday and tells me the "spider gear" is bad-broken teeth......

What would cause a differential to fail .....? :blink: the rear end is a ford 8.8 LS 3.55 ........I never had a rear end go on me - ever. My last van had 226,000 on it and nothing major was done to her since I owned her.

This van (2006) is under warranty so I didn't have to fork out for the repairs. 1 month earlier I had it to the dealers because the seal around the shaft from the steering box failed..........

I'm hoping I don't have a lemon.....just seams odd that the differential went, the seal around the shaft for the steering box is not uncommon , but a differential failure on a vehicle that has 66,000 miles.....:blink:

Any thoughts as to why it would have failed.....? :blink:
 

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I have a 2006 Ford E-150 with 66,000 miles on her. So I was pulling out of my driveway Thursday morning and turn out to the right and hear/feel this bang noise form the rear, like I drove over a large stone , pinched it , and it skipped off......
So I get out and look, nothing there.......:blink: I get back in and continue on. I make a left turn and I am hearing/feeling it again...!!!
When I drove straight there was no problem but as soon as I made a turn this noise, and jolt came from the back end.
So I went to the dealer I bought it from and the owner wanted to get in and take it for a ride. He gets in , puts it in reverse, turning to the left,went about 10' and the whole ass end of the van jerks.............
He tells me he has to keep the van and gets me a ride home from one of his sales reps. Calls me Friday and tells me the "spider gear" is bad-broken teeth......

What would cause a differential to fail .....? :blink: the rear end is a ford 8.8 LS 3.55 ........I never had a rear end go on me - ever. My last van had 226,000 on it and nothing major was done to her since I owned her.

This van (2006) is under warranty so I didn't have to fork out for the repairs. 1 month earlier I had it to the dealers because the seal around the shaft from the steering box failed..........

I'm hoping I don't have a lemon.....just seams odd that the differential went, the seal around the shaft for the steering box is not uncommon , but a differential failure on a vehicle that has 66,000 miles.....:blink:

Any thoughts as to why it would have failed.....? :blink:
Perhaps just a bad part. If its not a common problem i would guess poor quality control on that part that day.
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm beginning to fear a limited slip rear end......

The owner asked me if I was spinning my wheels, got stuck in the snow,....tells me that doing so could mess up my rear end......



We live in BUFFALO.....need I say anymore....:rolleyes:


Apparently there is a clutch pack in the rear end....
If the clutch pack is bad- is it possible that it could cause the failure...:blink:

http://images-ftp.americanmuscle.co...062,24062_alt1,24062_alt2&cust=true&pid=54363

I am thinking that you may be write- part failure,,,,,,just seemed odd that it would go......:blink:
 

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I'm beginning to fear a limited slip rear end......

The owner asked me if I was spinning my wheels, got stuck in the snow,....tells me that doing so could mess up my rear end......



We live in BUFFALO.....need I say anymore....:rolleyes:


Apparently there is a clutch pack in the rear end....
If the clutch pack is bad- is it possible that it could cause the failure...:blink:

http://images-ftp.americanmuscle.co...062,24062_alt1,24062_alt2&cust=true&pid=54363

I am thinking that you may be write- part failure,,,,,,just seemed odd that it would go......:blink:
LOL! Naw, it's just a Ford.:whistling

Makes you wonder what the prev owner used it for???

We had a Chebbie prematurely blow the rear out - it had been used for hauling the 7 litre hydro - between water getting in, and hauling 10K of boat and trailer, it popped waaay early.
 

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Your first sentence told me it was a spider gear. Clutch packs wear, most often felt as a mild chatter when turning.

As BC said a part failed, not really a common issue. Most failures on the Ford rear ends is the carrier bearings.

I broke teeth off the ring gear in my Excursion out launching a 280Z. Everything was fine until I hit a bump and the rear wheels hopped.

Tom
 

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I had a stick shift on my first truck with big tires. I used to blow u-joints like crazy. I drove agressive like most kids. I also needed to have the chocks rewelded. I think their called chocks. I also blew the rear along the wayand if I remember the spider gears were in the middle of the pumpkin. They are strong. The ring gear is most likely to lose a tooth.

I doubt you have big tires on a van but wheel hop would cause a sudden force like Tom said. Rears have shims too and are meticulously meshed together. Maybe it was never perfect from the begining and wore.

Other possibilities, a dry rear from a leak (which you would know) or debris entering the axles from being submerged. Maybe a salty winter in Buffalo?
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thanks Tom,

Man, that looks pretty bad......the guy at the dealership replaced the spiders and the axle gears......but they did not replace the clutch-pac.

You be nICE smalltown,,,,,,,,:laughing: I like ford trucks, vans.....everyone has their own likes and dislikes........;) I was going to get a Chevy but the ford was in great shape with low miles.......


Just seemed odd that the differential would go with such low milage.......:blink:

My understanding of limited slip is that when one wheel looses traction the other wheel will start to engage .....am I correct....:blink:

I was reading that if your clutch packs are bad you will only have 1 wheel gripping .......


The reason I am asking is because I was slightly stuck in the white wonder last month, nothing serious, and I noticed in my side mirrors that only 1 side was spinning,........I am wondering if I shouldn't have the clutch packs replaced.....? When they replaced the spider gears they did add the additive that ford recommends for the clutch packs and gear case. They didn't replace those as it is not a "safety issue " and does not affect the safety of the vehicle.....

I may be poking around the ass end of my E150 when the weather breaks....
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Shane,
What I meant was one wheel stops the other spins and vise versa......dependent upon traction....correct....?:blink:

If the clutch pack goes, only 1 wheel will spin....yes/no....?.:blink:


There were no leaks in the pumpkin or around the pitman shaft,...dry
 

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Yes the Ford 8.8 has a clutch pack limited slip. It uses friction of the clutch to transfer torque from the spinning wheel side to the non spinning wheel side.

These do wear out over time. Especially for people in heavy snow areas where throttle is required for 2wd vehicles to get moving. If there is life left on the clutch pack you can shim it to engage sooner. IIRC there are three sets of shims from ford to adjust the clutch pack.

Also the 8.8 is a small rear end for a van. The 8.8 also came in late model rangers, explorers, and mustangs. Not at all surprised you blew a spider gear. My cousin blew his explorer spider gear pulling a john boat out of a slippery boat ramp. Same situation as your heavy van stuck in snow.
 

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Shane,
What I meant was one wheel stops the other spins and vise versa......dependent upon traction....correct....?:blink:

If the clutch pack goes, only 1 wheel will spin....yes/no....?.:blink:


There were no leaks in the pumpkin or around the pitman shaft,...dry
That's correct. A limited slip transfers some (limited to clutch pack friction) of the "loose wheel" power to transfer to the solid traction wheel. If the clutch pack slips 100% (blown), it will transfer all of the power to the loose wheel at 2x the rpm. That is very hard on spiders. In normal ( non Buffallo ) on road conditions, the only time spiders have to spin is when you turn.

Since your dealer is fixing it for you, I'd just take it easy when you get in those slick, one wheel bite conditions. Spiders gears are small, & don't run on neeedle/ball bearings. Most likely, the shaft/gear bore wore, loosened the mesh, & boke a tooth.

I had a clutch pak go bad on an old 82 or so E150. Luckily, there was a local guy that rebuilt them on the side. It costs me about a $150 bucks in a swap out of the assembly.

Tom,
I had to do the exact same routine on an extended 15 pass Dodge van I had. The high speed growl finally became too scary, & I was amazed at how the inner race broke down. I suspect the taper bearing was preloaded too much at the original assembly setup, or was messed with at a later date.... possibly when a U-joint was changed out. At the time I fixed it, the internet help wasn't available, but I did exactly what you did...cut the bearing with a cutoff blade.
Joe
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks Joe,

I have done some research since this problem arose and apparently I don't have to stick with "fords" differential....there are other options. Pretty sad for it to go with only 66000 miles on her....:rolleyes: Smalltowns post of other owners with the same problem , around the same milage ,are not to encouraging......:rolleyes:
 

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On both my fords with limited slip, my truck had to maintain forward momentum to have the limited slip engage. If I just started out spinning one tire it would never engage. But if I had a little forward momentum I could see in the mirrors that both wheels were spinning.
 

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Brian,
I just now read the link Smalltown posted. That doesn't look good for Ford, but I have to wonder about how common it is. The one thing that could be a contributing factor is the ever increasing size of wheels on vehicles these days. At the rate it's going, we might all be driving vehicles with planetary axle setups!
Joe
 

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8.8 axles are pretty strong to the point if you go to WARN industries web site they list all modern axle specs. They use a chain driven machine to break the axle shafts and document the force it takes. Th 8.8 is about as close to a Dana 60 rear axle as you can get in a half ton. The 8.8 is a desireable swap into Jeeps for offroaders. There are many gear ratios available without having to swap carriers. Speaking of carriers, the limited slip carrier is the weak one. I have had an 8.8 with an Auburn ECTED locker running 36" x 13.5" by 15" IROK radials on a Jeep Wrangler and wheeled the snot out of it and never looked back. The weight of the Jeep makes for a nice stout set up.
As for causes of the failure of the spider gears, it could be something else such as a shim failure, maybe a c-clip of the in appropriate size or a piece of gear tooth got lodged in them, or just a chunk of some foreign matter.
In the limited slip axle you need to use a friction modifier in the gear lube or the clutch pack will never engage.
 

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8.8 axles are pretty strong to the point if you go to WARN industries web site they list all modern axle specs. They use a chain driven machine to break the axle shafts and document the force it takes. Th 8.8 is about as close to a Dana 60 rear axle as you can get in a half ton. The 8.8 is a desireable swap into Jeeps for offroaders. There are many gear ratios available without having to swap carriers. Speaking of carriers, the limited slip carrier is the weak one. I have had an 8.8 with an Auburn ECTED locker running 36" x 13.5" by 15" IROK radials on a Jeep Wrangler and wheeled the snot out of it and never looked back. The weight of the Jeep makes for a nice stout set up.
As for causes of the failure of the spider gears, it could be something else such as a shim failure, maybe a c-clip of the in appropriate size or a piece of gear tooth got lodged in them, or just a chunk of some foreign matter.
In the limited slip axle you need to use a friction modifier in the gear lube or the clutch pack will never engage.
Spider gear has nothing to do with axle shaft strength. The fact is the spider gears suck in the 8.8 but when built like for offroad it is a great axle because the shafts are so strong. C clip eliminator and swap out the carrier for a Detroit or spool and your set. Plus most people swap the explorer in because of the large disk brakes.

Cole
 
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