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Zimmermann
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KemoSabe
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Interesting product. Needle pilings? Is that what everyone else calls it? I've seen a house built on 30' thick fill. The "pile driver" drove us nuts for a few days. Sounded like a gigantic roto hammer.
Framerman, I know the machine you speak of. Many piling companies used to use water jetting to get the poles set, then bang them in with a steel driver dropped from a pre-determined height. An engineer on site performed a blow count to insure proper load bearing. This method would leave s#!t mud all over the lot to skate around on, unless the builder would invest in a little site prep.:thumbsup:
 

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Curmudgeon
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11,706 Posts
As long as I live, pile driver
will bring back the sound of the
steam driven one I saw as a Tad
on one of Dad's jobs.
They were driving steel piles
by the river, and it was constant....
PSSSSSSHT-CLANG!
PSSSSSSHT-CLANG!
PSSSSSSHT-CLANG!
PSSSSSSHT-CLANG!
PSSSSSSHT-CLANG!
...............!
:w00t:

:laughing:
 

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1,200 Posts
I wonder if the roto hammer would turn the pin into an extended bit to drive through larger basketball sized rocks. One of the good points about sonotubes is with a 12" diameter you can adjust slightly one way or the other to work around deep rocks and still set the post with plenty of room left. This looks like it is one shot with a small base.
 

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Administrator
Sawdust follows Me Everywhere
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60,309 Posts
I don't see those holding anything for to long. I don't see any real support, if that upper part was milled aluminum and the pins were a precision fit it might sway me....nah.
 

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Pro
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506 Posts
they do look like glorified deck blocks. the anchor bolt is a welcome upgrade.

overall I think that the conventional method of setting piers is preferred to these needle things and the oz-posts. speaking of which I used the oz-deck anchors on my deck, more out of curiosity than anything. here's the scoop on that:

a bit of a learning curve to get them set fairly straight. they do tend to go all over the place on rocks and other obstructions so you may end up an inch away from where you planned, and fixing that is a major pain. wet ground facilitates install, easier to set. so far they've been holding up an 800 sf deck for about a month with no settling (i keep a close eye on it :thumbsup:) the steel could have been a tad heavier as the anchor seems to twist easily around obstacles. once set and tamped they are rock solid.

these needle things do look like more of a pain as there are more spikes to pound into rocks and lose center.

i personally like these types of innovations, but I think in order for something like this to be accurate on the install, it needs to bore into the dirt like a helical pile.

to all the deck guys: concrete is NOT THE ONLY way to support structures :no:
 

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Contractor of the Month
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Needle pilings? Is that what everyone else calls it? I've seen a house built on 30' thick fill. The "pile driver" drove us nuts for a few days. Sounded like a gigantic roto hammer.
That sounds like a diesel hammer, they are annoying as heck; pile drivers on the other hand are almost therapudic.
 

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In Saint John, in some parts of the city, the big retail store, hotels and such do not have foundations, just a piles drivin into the ground to support the building. The grounds around some parts are so swampy that you couldn't build a foundation on them.

I've seen it used on a TV show once too, the guy seemed to rave the product up good (not sure if he was the salesman though). I would assume they would work great, just another way to skin the cat.

-Bill
 
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