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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a project now that I thought Dexpan might be the ticket to removing a slab under a shower. It sounds like the latest in slab removal and I was willing to give it a try.
My local lumber yard even has it on the shelf. I was able to slide the directions out of the $107.00 box to familiarize myself with what was required. I discovered a couple of things that I want to pass on.

It requires a minimum hole diameter of 1 1/2" - 2", drilled to 95% of thickness.
The hole must be clean and free of dust.
The slab needs to be able to move, there needs to be a relief point somewhere. The slab is expanding and needs somewhere to go.
It can start working in as little as 4 hours and most likely overnight.
It is best to cover it from excessive heat (sunlight).

And there is of course a recommended hole drill pattern.

We ended up not using this product because of these restrictions.
For one, I don't own anything with the capacity to drill a 2" hole.
(I checked on a Dewalt sds, $1100.00)The 2" bit alone was another $150.00.

This product could be useful for some things but, it wasn't right for us on this. We ended up renting a jackhammer for a $100 and we were done in less than a day.

Dexpan sounds good...drill holes, pour in, come back tomorrow and load up the pieces...but it has its limitations.

I just wanted to pass this on.
rj
 

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sounds like the only actual benefit of using it, is it minimizes noise & vibration. although you still have to hammer-drill.
 

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Alternative to Dexpan = Betonamit

For your job, there is an alternate product which requires only 1-1/4" holes. It's called Betonamit, and it pushes harder than Dexpan (therefore needing a smaller hole diameter). Betonamit costs more, but has a longer shelf life and works at all temperatures from freezing to 100 degrees F. With Dexpan there are are 4 different products that you have to choose from depending on the temperature of what you're breaking. That becomes a pain if you have some left over from a Winter job and want to use it in the Summer. More info is at betonamit.net
 

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ive just this past year started using dexpan on some bank work i got a hold of. The job/s involved removing night drop boxes from the location. Now if your not familiar with this the basically set the safe in place and form plywood arround it and encase the allready 1500 pound night drop in 2 to 3 feet of concrete with rebar and what ever bits of metal they have lying arround. Tried to do the first one with jackhammers and that took 3 guys all day... found out bout dexpan on here, went to safe 2 on a saturday, drilled the holes and poured the dexpan in, said a prayer and crossed my fingures... guys went back on monday to start the other work and when they saw the box they said it looked like someone strapped a bomb to it.... no hammerin what so ever, just cleaned up the pieces and bam done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not disputing whether it works or not. I wanted to let others know that it requires a bit more equipment and some strategy on how to work within its limitations. Seems I'm always learning something in this business and just wanted to pass it on.
rj
 
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