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Contractor
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I'll put in my 2 cents.

Call the manufacturer of the pigment and not the supplier. Explain with photos what you are up against. They should be able to give you directions on a possible remedy.

What it looks like, to me, is that someone spilled some of the release powder and them attempted to brush it off of the slab.

I would consider dry ice blasting or soda blasting that might be able to remove some of the pigment and get it to blend, then reseal.

Or my old faithful, Oxyclean, just kidding on that.
 

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Remodel
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I have to believe this could be seen before it was sealed. I wouldn't seal it looking like that.

I agree it looks like something was spilled, then got swabbed off.
 

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1 on 2
Mason
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55 Posts
Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be appreciated!
[/QUOTE]

Well, ya gotta put the table somewheres...
Grab me anuther beer, wouldya?
🍻🍻🍻
 

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Damned, I feel for you....and the customer. That looks awful. How about applying some kind of "tinted slurry topcoat" on it? There must be a way. (We all know that if we accidentally spilled some kind of "tinted slurry topcoat" on it, it would never come off....so maybe it would work. :) Just a thought. Good luck.
 

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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter #27
I’m interested what caused that blotchy look.

Was it just the powdered release being left on too long?

I have a long standing fear, or just deep respect, for concrete. When it goes wrong, it’s not usually an easy fix. 😳😟😄
May have been way too much release used, and possibly the concrete was a little too wet. 1 bucket of release should have covered the square footage, but the sub blew through it and I had to grab another bucket. I used to do stamped concrete 15 years ago in Florida and we didn't use release, just plastic sheeting to keep the stamp clean. It worked great. Ofcourse you didn't achieve the natural stone look in the coloring. Next time I think I will use the plastic and a very light application of release.
 

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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter #28
Damned, I feel for you....and the customer. That looks awful. How about applying some kind of "tinted slurry topcoat" on it? There must be a way. (We all know that if we accidentally spilled some kind of "tinted slurry topcoat" on it, it would never come off....so maybe it would work. :) Just a thought. Good luck.
Thanks for the tip, that is what the supplier recommended and customer doesn't want. The customer is not too upset, he just wants a discount. We settled on $800 off and he paid. Moving on!
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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5,016 Posts
Thanks for the tip, that is what the supplier recommended and customer doesn't want. The customer is not too upset, he just wants a discount. We settled on $800 off and he paid. Moving on!
Congrats. 👍

If they’re happy with that, I’d say that’s about the most painless way for this to end. 😄

Hang around the forum awhile. It’s actually a pretty decent place once you get involved.
 

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I think the $500 discount is more than generous and in all likelihood, given some time, that spot won't be nearly so noticeable.
 

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Had a similar experience with this one 5-6 years ago.



There was a 4' x 6' area that looked like chit in the middle (approx. 1800 SF total). My concrete sub tried several chemical fixes. Then cut the area out and repoured. The patch looked like chit as well. Ended up taking it all out and putting it all back in.

Wish I had a better answer for you.
 

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Residential Remodels/Additions
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You won’t correct it. Like an oil stain it’s there. Bust it out, or the obvious easy way out & eat the $1500. Then learn how to do contracting right & have some respect for real tradesmen. Construction education

Mike
In my younger days starting out as a contractor I somone told me something insightful. "Learning is expensive. I understand that this was costly for you, but some times you need to learn lessons the hard way and you probably will not make that mistake again."
 

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In my younger days I started out doing less risky jobs, cleaning gutters etc. like he talks about. Anybody with any common sense don’t start out doing colored concrete, I’ve done it all 40 years plus & wouldn’t even consider attempting it. No matter your experience trade wise we all have to know when to draw the line. No difference in colored concrete or building a piano. Hungry or not we all have limits

Mike
 

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Looks like there was some hand work with a float there and it's holding color.

Easy fix with that pattern, saw out a block or strip and repour it.
 

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What it looks like, to me, is that someone spilled some of the release powder and them attempted to brush it off of the slab.
That actually seems like a very accurate guess. Probably someone with inexperience.

Honestly I don't know why people still use the toss and cough dust, that stuff is a nightmare.
 

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What kind of colorant? Liquid?

And there is no issue with it penetrating past the release?
It's just pigment powder you mix with a gallon of water.

The release seems pretty much like WD-40 to me. It evaporates pretty quickly. You just spray it on right before you stamp as you go.

This is my order of events the morning after we pour. Strip forms, saw cut, wash and scrub with detergent.

While the concrete is still wet you mix up the color, and broom it in evenly, it will fall into the low spots giving it some good color.

A few hours later when completely dry, seal it.

Brickform is the brand my supplier carries I think.

 
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