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Just poured a 1000 sq' stamped patio with integral color and release, already cured and sealed. There is an area where the release is too prominent. I removed the seal from that area and attempted to scrub off the excess release but it is still there, see attached photo. My customer asked for a discount. I offered to take off $500. They said they can't accept that, asking for me to take $1500 off of their balance claiming they need to bring in someone to strip the seal from the whole patio and pressure wash the release off, then reseal. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be appreciated!
 

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If your the contractor it’s your baby. Why would you let them bring in another to fix it. Did you have them sign a contract? If your a concrete contractor you should have issues like this outlined in your contract. If just an ok do it, do whatever it takes to make them happy. In my eyes only a scab contractor would walk away & leave an eyesore whatever the pay. Guys like that only leaves a sour taste in the clients mouth only to taste it again when needing other work done. It’s called respect for the trades

Mike
 

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If your the contractor it’s your baby. Why would you let them bring in another to fix it. Did you have them sign a contract? If your a concrete contractor you should have issues like this outlined in your contract. If just an ok do it, do whatever it takes to make them happy. In my eyes only a scab contractor would walk away & leave an eyesore whatever the pay. Guys like that only leaves a sour taste in the clients mouth only to taste it again when needing other work done. It’s called respect for the trades

Mike
ber: 73966"]
If the solution is to strip the sealer, and pressure wash the release, why don't they pay full price and you fix it?

I'm always wary of situations like these: Why isn't the Contractor fixing the problem, and why is the HO asking for a discount, instead of asking the Contractor to fix the mistake?
[/QUOTE]
If the solution is to strip the sealer, and pressure wash the release, why don't they pay full price and you fix it?

I'm always wary of situations like these: Why isn't the Contractor fixing the problem, and why is the HO asking for a discount, instead of asking the Contractor to fix the mistake?
If your the contractor it’s your baby. Why would you let them bring in another to fix it. Did you have them sign a contract? If your a concrete contractor you should have issues like this outlined in your contract. If just an ok do it, do whatever it takes to make them happy. In my eyes only a scab contractor would walk away & leave an eyesore whatever the pay. Guys like that only leaves a sour taste in the clients mouth only to taste it again when needing other work done. It’s called respect for the trades

Mike
Any advise on how to correct the color? I stripped the seal, pressure washed, hit it with cleaner, scrubbed the hell out of it with a buffer, and the release agent still won't budge.
 

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You won’t correct it. Like an oil stain it’s there. Bust it out, or the obvious easy way out & eat the $1500. Then learn how to do contracting right & have some respect for real tradesmen. Construction education

Mike
 

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Me thinks JFConstruction is a DIY or home owner looking for a answers or documentation. Close this thread, please. Smells like a rat.
 

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You won’t correct it. Like an oil stain it’s there. Bust it out, or the obvious easy way out & eat the $1500. Then learn how to do contracting right & have some respect for real tradesmen. Construction education

Mike
What makes you assume that I don't "do contracting right"? I respectfully reached out to the online contractor community for advice. I am licensed/insured, experienced and reputable.
 

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Me thinks JFConstruction is a DIY or home owner looking for a answers or documentation. Close this thread, please. Smells like a rat.
Geese. I've always enjoyed referencing conversations on this website and appreciated the resource. God forbid I actually join in!
 

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My suggestion is to contact, your local supplier of materials, or contact the sub-contractor/contractor/neighbor or whom ever helped you. Nothing seems clear to me exactly, who performed the work. It is all just a little suspicious, IMO
 

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My suggestion is to contact, your local supplier of materials, or contact the sub-contractor/contractor/neighbor or whom ever helped you. Nothing seems clear to me exactly, who performed the work. It is all just a little suspicious, IMO
Ok, thank you- I did that already. My sub is useless, supplier suggested applying a stain over the whole thing, HO doesn't want that. I was hoping a concrete pro might chime in with some miracle tip for removing release..
 

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Highwayman
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ber: 73966"]
If the solution is to strip the sealer, and pressure wash the release, why don't they pay full price and you fix it?

I'm always wary of situations like these: Why isn't the Contractor fixing the problem, and why is the HO asking for a discount, instead of asking the Contractor to fix the mistake?


Any advise on how to correct the color? I stripped the seal, pressure washed, hit it with cleaner, scrubbed the hell out of it with a buffer, and the release agent still won't budge.
[/QUOTE]

Some of us here can be a little rough around the edges, especially towards folks who aren’t known to the community.

There have actually been some very poor contractors on here, and an endless stream of DIYers posing as contractors, so that’s part of it. 😟😄

As for how to fix it, I don’t have a great deal of experience with colored concrete. Done a few, but not many.

Im assuming a colored concrete, and then a colored powdered release?

In my experience, once concrete is colored, it’s colored for good. 🙄

You might be able to stain it a different color ( darker).

Or worst case scenario is it comes out and gets redone.

I will say that no matter how much money you take off, the customer will always have a bad taste in their mouth, because they won’t remember the cheap price they paid, just the fact that they didn’t get what they wanted.
For whatever that’s worth.
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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My suggestion is to contact, your local supplier of materials, or contact the sub-contractor/contractor/neighbor or whom ever helped you. Nothing seems clear to me exactly, who performed the work. It is all just a little suspicious, IMO
His post seems pretty straight forward.

He has stated that he is a licensed contractor, with a project that has gone somewhat sideways.

Lots of us have been there.
 

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Any advise on how to correct the color? I stripped the seal, pressure washed, hit it with cleaner, scrubbed the hell out of it with a buffer, and the release agent still won't budge.
Some of us here can be a little rough around the edges, especially towards folks who aren’t known to the community.

There have actually been some very poor contractors on here, and an endless stream of DIYers posing as contractors, so that’s part of it. 😟😄

As for how to fix it, I don’t have a great deal of experience with colored concrete. Done a few, but not many.

Im assuming a colored concrete, and then a colored powdered release?

In my experience, once concrete is colored, it’s colored for good. 🙄

You might be able to stain it a different color ( darker).

Or worst case scenario is it comes out and gets redone.

I will say that no matter how much money you take off, the customer will always have a bad taste in their mouth, because they won’t remember the cheap price they paid, just the fact that they didn’t get what they wanted.
For whatever that’s worth.
[/QUOTE]
Thanks, I'm sort of stumped. Never been unable to correct an issue!
 

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I agree on the respect for concrete. Even pouring plain without color, stamp etc, I’ve seen it cure different colors in slabs and flatwork. Could be in the mix, the added product a head scratcher for sure. My flatwork guy told me a while back his supplier was doing so much volume the mix was crap causing like issues.

Mike
 
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