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For a low-profile (but not ground level) deck, what's the shortest I can go with a notched 6x6 post? With an overall grade to deck surface height of 22", using a typical post and beam construction eats up my post height quickly when I factor in pier rising 2" above grade, a 1" post standoff, doubled 2x10 beam, 2x8 joist and 5/4 decking.

As such, I'm left with a measly 2.75" of post surface to support the beam. Seems like so little wood between fresh cuts is a recipe for disaster. Barely makes 6" clearance between beam and soil, too.

I suppose I could go without the cantilevered beam and go with a flush header (where beams and joists are flush at the top. Never did one of those, but it would seem the post centers would really need to be precise (no fudge factor).

Another thought I had was doing a beam to pier design, where the beams are strapped to the concrete pier tops (no post), but using larger lumber for the beams to get the height. No easy way to adjust for level, though if the piers aren't perfect.

Appreciate any advice. Thanks.
 

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For a low-profile (but not ground level) deck, what's the shortest I can go with a notched 6x6 post? With an overall grade to deck surface height of 22", using a typical post and beam construction eats up my post height quickly when I factor in pier rising 2" above grade, a 1" post standoff, doubled 2x10 beam, 2x8 joist and 5/4 decking.

As such, I'm left with a measly 2.75" of post surface to support the beam. Seems like so little wood between fresh cuts is a recipe for disaster. Barely makes 6" clearance between beam and soil, too.

I suppose I could go without the cantilevered beam and go with a flush header (where beams and joists are flush at the top. Never did one of those, but it would seem the post centers would really need to be precise (no fudge factor).

Another thought I had was doing a beam to pier design, where the beams are strapped to the concrete pier tops (no post), but using larger lumber for the beams to get the height. No easy way to adjust for level, though if the piers aren't perfect.

Appreciate any advice. Thanks.

My lumber yard has brackets that can be adjusted for height 0-6" (think HDG threaded rod and an adjustable nut to give clearance). That being said I wouldn't worry about the short post, I would just soak the entire piece in a bucket of end treat solution for as long as possible.
 

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I would make those mini posts from composite glued together for thickness. It would certainly hold up better than wood.
Steve

For a low-profile (but not ground level) deck, what's the shortest I can go with a notched 6x6 post? With an overall grade to deck surface height of 22", using a typical post and beam construction eats up my post height quickly when I factor in pier rising 2" above grade, a 1" post standoff, doubled 2x10 beam, 2x8 joist and 5/4 decking.

As such, I'm left with a measly 2.75" of post surface to support the beam. Seems like so little wood between fresh cuts is a recipe for disaster. Barely makes 6" clearance between beam and soil, too.

I suppose I could go without the cantilevered beam and go with a flush header (where beams and joists are flush at the top. Never did one of those, but it would seem the post centers would really need to be precise (no fudge factor).

Another thought I had was doing a beam to pier design, where the beams are strapped to the concrete pier tops (no post), but using larger lumber for the beams to get the height. No easy way to adjust for level, though if the piers aren't perfect.

Appreciate any advice. Thanks.
 

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