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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Been a while since I've done this. I'm getting all kinds of different input about prep.

I do -- or do not have to strip the deck prior to staining ? I'm using SW Deckscapes semi - transparent stain.

I'm also getting info that if the deck is worn, as this one is, and absorbs water, rather than repels, (water bead test) I can clean it up and stain it ?

Some clarification would be good.
 

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Basically, a quick brush down with some concentrated house cleaner will do fine if its not peeling. Just be sure to use a petroleum based stain if that's what was originally used. If acrylic stain was used...fine, use that for ease of cleanup.

Areas that have worn down will absorb more of the stain than areas where water still beads up, so multiple coats will be needed to build up a uniform appearance.

Deck stains really need to be re-coated on a regular basis and not let go to the point where some stain is still there and other places it's worn off down to bare wood. BAD. Then it gets to the point where you'll indeed get advice to strip it all down. Why? To insure total uniformity of stain appearance. In your case, I think you can just multiple coat it and it will look satisfactory.

Nice looking deck and back yard there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Appreciate that response. I know its close to a diy question but I don't like to make mistakes.

Also about the oil with oil...I think SW does have alkyd semi. I've got to go by the job again in a day or two.

I usually use about 5% Simple Green and 5% Bleach -- make up 4 gal then a pump sprayer, brush if needed -- hose off well.
 

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Yes, SW's Deckscape semi-transparent stains come in solvent and water base. The water based is available in both semi-transparent and solid.

What is the existing coating? Determine that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wonder how I can determine if the existing stain is oil or latex ? Denatured alcohol test ? I might be able to tell if I look at it closely from a protected i.c.

I think it is latex and would prefer a latex top coat --- we have high humidity, lack of burn off here.
 

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I wonder how I can determine if the existing stain is oil or latex ? Denatured alcohol test ? I might be able to tell if I look at it closely from a protected i.c.

I think it is latex and would prefer a latex top coat --- we have high humidity, lack of burn off here.
Yes...try the alcohol test. Find an area not worn down by weathering to perform the test on. Maybe check the garage for leftover can or ask the owner or present tenant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
He just cleaned out his garage after about 10 yrs. I pretty sure it was Olympic as I saw the can. A young guy - not a tradesman did it so most likely water.

Appreciate your help.

In that era though Olympic was quite a bit alkyd + wb - water clean up.
 

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Yes, you could clean up with soapy water, but when you finished cleaning your brush with water and used some thinner, you could see a lot of oil product rinsing out.

I always thought that was sneaky of companies calling their product "water clean up."

Ya...right pal...if all you use are cheapo disposable brushes...then fine.

In any case, the deck looks beaten and weathered enuff to go with solvent or acrylic. Water blasting would be beneficial if in doubt. That would scratch up the surface to make the final coat stick. Yes...water blasting the paint film etches (scratches) hard paint surfaces at the molecular level and makes "tooth" for a primer or final coat to adhere to.
 
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