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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any info or experiance using a deck finish called "one time". The manufactor claims it has a 7 year life expectancy on cedar decking. Thanks
 

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Never heard of it. Check out Para Raincoat, it contains wax, the best sealer for wood. And you can recoat without sanding/scraping anything!!!
 

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I've heard about it, but have not seen it in use. No one sells it around here & it is very expensive to order & have shipped.

I seem to remember some folks on another forum saying it worked well. However I doubt anything would last 7 years with only one coat here.
 

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7 Years?

I'm not familiar with the product, but if they are quoting 7 years, it must be pretty good stuff. I agree with Deckman that we won't be able to see a 7 year lifespan here in FL, but still, if it got us 3 years, that would be better than anything else we've used to date. Tristan, let us know if you use "one time" and your thoughts on the application.
 

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John Hyatt
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Man we have been thru the one time guys over and over at several sites.

They will not give up its always the same,someone gets on and asks about it, not a rep of course,and on and on it goes.

If you read the fine print, you have to wonder just what exactley do that stuff do. And what is the warenty good for, and what will it protect against, and how did they come up with One Time, and what is the 7 years all about, and.......well you get the idea. The more you dig the more you come up with the same as cleaning out the sepict tank. J.
 

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From what I have read, wax is a bad idea and usually as sign of a cheaper sealer.
Wax is what is used to seal hardwood lumber coming from South America and other places. It is considered the best way to seal lumber, achieving about 90% seal ability. Para of course also contains linseed oil and other additives for uv protection etc.

I did a log building with it about 9 yrs ago, walls. The ownership has changed hands about three times, and no one has maintained it. I drive past this building every day and it still looks pretty good. Faded, but no failure in the product - no peeling or anything, as it soaks in, not a surface stain.
 

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Wild claims

We've all heard some of the wild claims these folks make. Funny, the sales girl over @ one of the local ipe suppliers was trying to pitch some new sealer to me. It's called Wood Protect. They claim it has UV inhibitors in a clear sealer, waterbased, non toxic, zero VOC. The thing that really struck me was she said it will reduce the surface temp. of the wood 7-10%.

I gotta see this stuff, asked for some sample cans so I could try it out on some scraps. I want to see how this new sealer will hold up in a summer of 100 degree days.

I googled it up & found their site, www.kinlochusa.com , click on products then on wood protect. All those claims she mentioned were right there on their site, except the part about reducing the temps 7-10%. Says it's nanotechnology.

I'll report the results of my test pieces @ the end of summer, that's about halloween around here.
 

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I've seen the One Time, one of the companies doing thermally modified wood is using it as a factory coat. Have some concerns as what I saw it did not appear to be a pentrating finish. If not then it may peel off after time. I have a sample of the Kinross, pretty expensive but if it works... It is absolutely clear. I did a foot long piece in the garage but when I went to put it outside, could not determine which side I had applied it. Very Very clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sealing recomendation

Sorry for the delay getting back, my comp. Went down. I wound up using the one time product, but it has it's drawbacks. First -all of the old finish has to be removed, so that the new stuff can penetrate. This meant an initial cleaning with tsp and bleach. This was followed by a chemical stripping of the old remaining cabot stain that was still left. This was followed with a acid neutralizer to return the cedar to its natural color. All of this scrubbing left the decking with a fuzzy coating in spots that required some sanding. So much for the prep. The sealing requires 48 hours of dry time prior to application followed by 48 hours of sunshine to cure the product. Needless to say that's hard to come by here in new england. I applied the product yesterday, 2 hours to coat 350 sq. Ft. With a pad applicator followed with brush out to cover plank edges-two man job . Sunshine lasted till end of day, then rain overnight followed by hard rain today. I tarped over the deck at days end to protect the as yet uncured product. Hoping for some sun tomorrow. I'll post further info as it developes.
 

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Does anyone have any info or experiance using a deck finish called "one time". The manufactor claims it has a 7 year life expectancy on cedar decking. Thanks
I used it on 2 different pressure treated decks I built around 2yrs ago. I just saw one of them last May, and it still looks like I just sealed it (and it gets a LOT of NY sun exposure).

I typically have sprayed deck sealants in the past, but this stuff is pretty THICK, and it would have required thinning in order to spray it. For the railing/stair parts, I tried a lambs wool staining "mit", but had much better luck using a car wash mit instead. Using one of those awesome "Paint pals" in one hand, I dipped the mit and gently caressed every inch of the deck components with the mit. This took some time, but really wasn't all that bad once you get going. I believe I used a thick nap roller for the decking, which sped things up.

Anyway, yes- it does seem expensive...but if it lasts 7yrs as the manufacturer claims, it's worth it, IMO. And it goes REAL far. I used under 2 gal for each deck, and they were each 12 x 16, at least 6ft high with staircases (closed risers).

I was pretty impressed with the quality of the stuff, but "time will tell" just how good it really is, I guess. :whistling

(BTW, I am in no way affiliated with Bond Distributing)
 

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John Hyatt
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One more time....What does it do. What is the warenty good for and against what. No real advantage reading the info on line it says nothing as well. J.
 

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One more time....What does it do.
From their site:

One TIME® wood protector is a proprietary acrylate resin blend that contains no water, wax or solvents. The resins are cured by natural sunlight and become part of the cellular structure of the wood. One TIME® contains 100 percent solids, where conventional treatments usually contain only 5-20 percent solids. Conventional treatments typically contain water and/or solvents that can cause the wood's cellular structure to swell, then shrink as it dries, causing cracking. Water and solvents also dissipate quickly into the air. And because most wood treatments build up on the surface and eventually wash away, it becomes necessary to reseal the wood every one-to-two years.
Because One TIME® penetrates and is cured into the wood, it provides protection for seven years. As a result, Bond Distributing offers a 7-year warranty on One TIME®, compared to the one-to-two year warranties offered with conventional treatments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Deck sealant

After a full day of hard rain, we pulled the tarp off the deck, and found some water spotting. After the sun beat onthe deck for most of the day, just about all of ths spots were gone. This stuff does not dry as conventional sealers do. It really needs sunshine to cure. I wouldn't recomend for a north facing deck, it'd take forever to cure. The customer is holding off two more days to allow full cure before moving table and chairs back on.
 

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It shouldn't take more than 48hrs to cure, even if it never sees direct sunlight. As long as it is "outdoors" where there are still UV rays, it will cure...it's just that direct sunlight will cure it faster. It does not need "direct sunlight" to cure, however...

I wonder if a UV curing "lamp" would speed up the process for the shady areas??


Anyway- it's always best to try and use this when there is NO rain in the forecast for a couple days!
 

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John Hyatt
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But what does it protect against, in other words how do you know if it fails. Ive already read that. All I can gain is it gets into the wood.

My projects require uv,water,and mold/mildew protection TWP has all of that and its pretty easy to figure out when its time for a recoat.

So why is it one time or 7 years and what does it do. J.
 

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But what does it protect against,
Water and UV radiation.

in other words how do you know if it fails. .
If you see the water does not bead up and/or the wood is checking, etc- that would mean it failed. Otherwise, it's still protecting. :clap:

About-

FAQS-

Their toll free number in case you still have any questions (they were very helpful, knowledgeable and friendly on the phone when I called with my questions/concerns):

866 663 8463

Again- I am not affiliated with Bond, nor do I have any financial reason to "promote" their product. I simply have used it on 2 decks, and was quite impressed. YMMV.
 

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They call it "One Time", because that's how many times you'll use it in your career. With the pain in the ass of applying it, with the pain in the ass cure time, along with the pain in the ass cost, not to mention it's seriously doubtful that the stuff will last 7 years, you'll try it "one time" and vow "never again". :laughing:
 
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