Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,716 Posts
Bummer, Nathan, thanks for the reminder. Take care, R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Lock-out/Tag-out, I've seen the rules. We all pooh-pooh the rules. Just don't forget why these rules exist. Usually because somebody got hurt.

If machismo scores points, be a real man and give it up for money.

But what are we worth?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
That is, how do you value a man's life?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Are we talking about plugging appliances in? One of our tree guys got killed last year tripping on a step, (while working), and hitting his head on the corner of the concrete stoop after 34 years climbing trees. Are we going to put rubber bumpers on all the steps in the country? Lets not give those Federal waco's anymore power than they already have. If it wasn't for there Federal jobs they would be on unimployment.
 

·
Repair/Remodeling Tech.
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
Falling and hitting your head is an accident. Not locking out a curcuit before working on it, is just asking for trouble. Whether OSHA says it's ok or they don't (and they don't, just for the record) it doesn't matter. It should be policy for any company doing ANY electrical work. No warnings, no "3 strikes and your out", you lock out, or you're gone, period. Before anyone says it, yes I've done it too, but I shoulda been fired for it, and I WOULD HAVE been wrote for it if OSHA was around. So far (the very, VERY few times I've done it) I've been lucky. It just wasn't his lucky day. Bottom line is, a man...a husband, a dad, maybe grandpa, is dead...because he did something he knew better than to do. Just hope it makes us all think next time we're in the same situation. Even 110 is WAY more than enough to stop your heart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
If I have to lock out to plug in an appliance I'll just stay home and annoy people on "Contractor Talk"
 

·
GC/ Master Electrician
Joined
·
384 Posts
This type of post reallys makes me think sometimes. I have one of the few jobs where you have to do 90% of your wiring live. I do alot of hospital work and am unable to kill someones breathing machine to do work on the circuit. I have to keep very precise records on what im doing and when. It makes me really appreciate when I get to do commercial or residential and can kill the circuit. Think maybe it's time to retire from institutional work after pushing my luck for this many years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
I have stayed out of this because it brought out a really bad memory.

I was 16 and working a commercial job with my dad. This was back when almost all tools had metal housings, grounded tools were just begining to come out and we were rehabing older commercial buildings with only dual outlet receptacals.

It had rained and there was water about 2" deep in the low spots. One of our carpenters fired up a circular saw while standing in a puddle. I remember the sound of his scream today. It was also the first guy that I ever saw die.
 

·
Pro Painter
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Teetorbilt said:
I have stayed out of this because it brought out a really bad memory.

I was 16 and working a commercial job with my dad. This was back when almost all tools had metal housings, grounded tools were just begining to come out and we were rehabing older commercial buildings with only dual outlet receptacals.

It had rained and there was water about 2" deep in the low spots. One of our carpenters fired up a circular saw while standing in a puddle. I remember the sound of his scream today. It was also the first guy that I ever saw die.
I can't even begin to imagine.......:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
I saw a worker die about 15 years ago. A salesman right in front of me got T-boned by a lady running a light, late for work , putting on makeup. In this state the largest number of work related injuries and deaths are in jobs requiring driving cars, small vans, and pickups. <P>

I ran framing crews for 20 years with none, zero, zip accidents. I don't think OSHA has a clue as to what makes a jobsite safe. Their mission is to justify their existence and propagate their bureaucracy.<P>


Hope those ribs start feeling better soon Teetor.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
AAPaint said:
I can't even begin to imagine.......:eek:

When I was an apprentice in the HVAC trade some nitwit journeyman asked me to drill something while I had to stand in a puddle and it was drizzling rain out. I refused.
He then told me it has a GFI so I did not need to worry. I told him to do it.
He did it.
Sometimes people don't think.We were only allowed to work on things up to 600 volts. I have been hit by 440. It wakes you up in a hurry.
We had one engineer at the company hit and killed by 13,200 volts.
Those panels behind locked gates that hiss real loud. He should not have been in there. It leapt right out of the panel into him and fried his organs.
You need to be an electrician with special training to work on those things.
I would not want to do it.
 

·
Registered
Custom cabinetry
Joined
·
9,178 Posts
Bummer to hear, this is why I wont touch electrical except to put a new end on my saw (happens a lot:cheesygri ) I have homeowners ask me all the time if I want to put up new fixtures for them and I dont even think about it. Lets all be safe out there even if it takes a few extra minutes or having to push a job back a day due to weather. A mans life is pricless.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top