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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought 86 sheets of 3/4 T&G OSB today at an auction. After busting the pallets open to place in storage I found maybe 1/4 of the sheets damp in the middle (no dampness at edges) and no visible mold or mildew (yet).

I won't be using the OSB for awhile, and I don't have room to spread it out to dry. I also don't look forward to cutting three slats per sheet and then restacking to let air in.

If I don't do anything will the OSB mold/mildew for sure (it hasn't yet, but I don't know how long it's been damp either). If it does mold/mildew anybody know anything I could use to remove it before or after installation?

thanks,
 

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Well it sounds like you know what to do to dry it. I don't know any other way.
 

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.....

stack it against a wall on it's side with gaps between sheets to dry.
I'm sure it's nothings dangerous some houses sit for months exposed to the weather and see alot of moisture during winter construction.
 

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Yea but think about this Wicked, 1. We always try to close up as quick as we can. 2. Surface water is removed ASAP. 3. Water's not getting trapped on an in-progress.

I'm kinda wondering how it got there, seems to me if the whole bundle had gotten soaked through the outer sheets and edges would have swelled up.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The OSB was produced in July, 05 (by Louisiana Pacific I think) The T&G edges are still tight and crisp, no visible swelling. I'm thinking maybe it was there from when it was manufactured.

Does anybody know if in the production of OSB if there is any kiln drying that would occur after the stuff has been cut and stacked (in pallets)?
 

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Don't stack it against a wall on it's side, unless of course you LIKE bowed floors. All manufacturers recommend stacking flat. You may have to buckle down and slat it, or buy a bundle of lathes (surveying stakes) their about the right size to go between them and if their not 4 feet long, they don't miss it by much.
 

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The strands or what they call the precisely cut pieces of wood that make up OSB are dried before they are put into the resin, there is no rewetting of the wood after that or any kiln drying that I know of, just a blending in the resin mix, a forming step, a pressing step and then the finishing which only involves edge coating and stamping.
 

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I have popped open a few bundles of OSB and found them to be damp to the touch in the middle. Personally I dont see this as a problem. If there is mold growing on them then that tells me that the bundle had been opened and the sheets separated enough to allow the mold spores to get in. Most bundles of OSB have a bit of a vacuume seal to them (as evidence of having to slide them a few inches to get them apart. lol try pulling one streight up!) So far I have never seen mold growing on OSB.
As for exposed OSB during wet weather. A good coat of Thompsons or the equivalent will work till you can dry it in. If there are puddles every day then drill a few 1/4 inch holes for drainage. use a 16p nail to clean out as needed.
 
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