Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was taught how to paint I was taught to dip my brush, scrape off one side back into the can and then cut in.

A painter friend of mine just dips his brush, knocks it inside the can and cuts in.

Just curious as to what method everyone else is using. I tried the dip/knock method today and though I can see some benefits to it I find it a lot harder to keep from dripping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,677 Posts
I use the dip and tap method. Try a different brush or paint. I have been using a 3-4 inch flat brush lately to cut in and it is working as good or better than the 2" angled sash I used to use. In fact, I've kind of gotten away from angled brushes all together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,059 Posts
dip/tap here. taught be two pro painters and it's much faster than dip/scrape imo. dip/scrape takes too much paint out of the brush also.
I will say after they taught me that way it took a good while of practice to become good at it though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
I consider dip/tap good form, so I'm trying to get there. But I still do a lot of dip/scrape. My problem is not the dripping. I can't figure out how to cut tight to the ceiling when there is all that paint on top of the brush. So sometimes, even if I don't scrape on the cut can, I will just wipe the back of the brush on the wall to clean it off.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
36,427 Posts
I'll use both, depending. If I'm lucky I don't have to use either. I'll also use a one or two side slap on exterior painting (forces a lot of paint into the well). Makes a mess of the brush.

Generally I'm laying down a line of paint close to where I want it, and then moving into final position, so ideally I can do this with no tap or wipe, depending on the paint and brush.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
36,427 Posts
I've tried about every brush - next one I'll try is a Picasso to see if I can cut faster with it (I'm pretty fast as it is).

To me, scraping the side is a failure - either of the combination of brush and paint, or planning the paint load distribution. I'll scrape a side or both sides to adjust how wet my brush is when I have to use a smaller load / dryer brush - typically this is a screw up on my part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I guess I'm lucky I have a bunch of painting to do here at home so I can practice. I can cut at a fairly steady pace, but it seems I keep getting more and more painting work so I need to have have some better speed.
 

·
Super Moderator
Drywall, Texturing and Painting
Joined
·
11,348 Posts
A painter friend of mine just dips his brush, knocks it inside the can and cuts in.
That's how I do it too. :thumbup:
*Unless I'm trying to cut a tight line on the top of some trim or any other simular situation like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Dip, swirl (never scrape any off) then make palette adjacent to area cutting in. Work from that "reservoir" rather than going back to the pail as often.
 

·
Pro Painters
Joined
·
38 Posts
I was taught that you could tell a imposter from a professional if he/she scrapes the brush on the rim. That's how you end up with more paint dripping off your elbow than on the wall. 3 inch straight brush is the way to go. Angle brushes are for rookies. :) Just joking, but really.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
The more paint you take off the brush before getting it to the wall, the more dipping you'll do, and you'll never be able to get really fast at cutting.
This. A 3" wall brush has really sped my cutting in. I load it, blot just below my cut line, fan my brush out and cut away... then I redip where I blotted to 'reload' and continue my cut. Then I smooth it out... I find this method has really increased my speed. I use the thicker 1" brushes too.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top