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Discussion Starter #1


I'm not sure if this is the exact tool, but it is pretty close and looks similar to what I was looking at.

You can use it for cutting the bottom of doors in place. Could be quite a time saver when you compare it to what it takes to do it otherwise. - Setting up saw horses, removing the door, marking and clamping a guide on the door and cutting with a circular saw, reinstall the door. Anybody use one of these and know the right one?
 

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We use this



for jobs that require a delicate touch :cheesygri
 

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DGR,IABD
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I've seen that tool used regularly by tile guys to undercut jamb trim and door stop moulding to lay floor tile. I think it's actually referred to as a jamb saw. I think it would make a royal mess of a door. I wouldn't have the stones to try it on a door slab.

The last time I had carpet laid in one of my rentals, all the doors needed cut off. The carpet man left them all off the hinges, propped up against the wall with a note saying "your carpenter will have to saw off these doors." No tool required, just a Post-It note and a pencil. :cheesygri
 

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I agree mdshunk - the problem with doing a door in place with a jamb saw is that you can never cut completely through the door on the hinge side without possibly cutting into the casing - like you said I wouldn't have the stones either.
 

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You eventually reach a point where something cannot be done better or faster. I think that this is one of those cases. Set up the horses and knock out the pins.
Is it faster to cut outside or clean up all of the dust inside?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting, there is a picture of the one I was referring to cutting a door on the hinges, it says up to 1 3/4 inch thick doors. My concerns were getting a good clean cut on those cheap veneer doors since the blade looks pretty mean and not really a find tooth one.

Yep, it is called a Jam Saw.
 

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Yeah, - - scary idea, - - guess it's possible with a good blade and some knife lines, - - or at least some tape, - - too risky for me. I'd use it for just the jamb saw it is, - - and ignore the extra hype.
 

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Years ago, we called them a 'brush hog'. Good for clearing lots and taking down small trees.
 

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What'ya mean? It's a jam saw isn't it? For barn doors maybe? Lawnmower? Hoof deburrer?

It's and old tree saw / bush hog. Keeps new growth cut back.
 

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That thing looks like it's from the 40's or somethin', - - awesome, - - definitely would do any job, - - does it come with a 'finish' blade?
 

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That is the finish blade "rough".
 

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Funny how they didn't come with a safety shield. I wonder how you could even use it without hurting yourself or someone else.
 

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Rich, That machine was from the old days, when men were men and lawyers worked only for rich folks. BTW look at the sucker. The blade is pretty far away and it has to move 700 lbs. of machine to spin on you. Add your input to the handles and I don't see it being that unsafe.
In the old days, most of the time there wasn't anybody else. Been there.
 

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I was kidding Steve. Text correspondence makes that hard to convey, I know. I agree that it's not that unsafe.
When I was a year or two old my folks would ride me around in the family car, a '57 MGA, on the transmission hump. From what I'm told I got thrown to the floor boards more than once while 'stopping short' (that could explain some things). Point being a lot of things are considered dangerous now that were once not even considered (in some states kids are required to use car seats to age six).
At age 9 I'd ride on the hitch of a Farmall, between the tractor and trailer, and jump on and off to pick-up stray bales. I feel sorry for kids now days that have to suffer through the likes of bike helmets and car seats and can't enjoy a ride in the back of a pick-up truck.
 

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My dad had an original 'woody'' from before WWII. He let some of his buddies use it and it was totaled. Mom drove a 47 Plym. wag. for a while, I remember that car well.
My first car was a '55 Roadmaster, and a roadmaster it was. 6300#s of car rolling down the road. I always joked that it had 150#s of chrome stuck on it.
 

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Crain makes two saws that will undercut doors in place. Models 812 and 820. I purchased the 820 before the 812 came out.

I have undercut doors in place many times without any problems. I ordered an extra blade that I only use for that purpose. It is very handy on pocket doors. You can cut hinged doors in place without hitting the jambs/casing. You just have to be careful with it. I always tape the door bottoms with the 'purple' tape and have someone steady the door as I cut.

If I had it to do all over again I would get the 812 because of the dust port.
 

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Mike Finley said:
The safety shield was the one line of advice in the manual "Warning: Don't put your lips on it."

LOL
 
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