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Always Learning
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We had 4 gable pediments figured for our new build. Fypon changed their price to us right before we ordered them. It almost doubled! Decided that we should try making them in house.

Everything was simple cuts...but we needed to make the radius piece. Talked to our supplier and they said heat forming pvc was easy enough. We used Kleer pvc trim in 5/4 thickness.

Here's our "oven", jig, and finished pieces. They are an 8/12 pitch and 11' long.



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Very nice work!

Did you check with other suppliers to see what was available? I ordered one a few years ago online and it was pretty inexpensive and decent quality. I think the 11' length of yours would make ordering a stock item impossible though.
 

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Always Learning
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We did check around and so did our supplier. The size was way over any stock ones. Originally was quoted $1000 for four, their new price was $1800. It was a fun learning project. The right temperature is key!
 

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VERY nicely done OA! :thumbsup:

Fypon is pretty proud of their stuff aren't they? Whenever I need something, like that, I generally use NUWOOD. They even let me return some 5" window headers I ordered in the wrong size one time. Sure, they charged me a 15% restock fee.... but Fypon would have NEVER let me do that.
 

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overanalyze said:
We did check around and so did our supplier. The size was way over any stock ones. Originally was quoted $1000 for four, their new price was $1800. It was a fun learning project. The right temperature is key!
So what is the right temperature since it is key? ;)

We tried to replace small sections of curved brick moulding on a circle head window on a low budget rot repair job. I tried heating the pvc with a heat gun, and a blow torch.

The torch is what ended up working, it looked like a hack job probably... Had burn marks on it and wasn't flexible enough to curve well. That heater looks like an awesome trick though. Any details on it?
 

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Always Learning
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So what is the right temperature since it is key? ;)

We tried to replace small sections of curved brick moulding on a circle head window on a low budget rot repair job. I tried heating the pvc with a heat gun, and a blow torch.

The torch is what ended up working, it looked like a hack job probably... Had burn marks on it and wasn't flexible enough to curve well. That heater looks like an awesome trick though. Any details on it?
This would've worked great for that. It needs even temperature across the whole piece. They want the pvc to be 280-290 degrees.

We bought some 6" oval ducting and a couple adapters/reducers. We bought a small piece of cheap pvc to experiment on first before doing the final pieces. Fired up our torpedo heater and slid in the trim.

We let one in there a little to long and the end closest to the heater got a little burnt, but we allowed for plenty of waste on the ends.

When it's ready, it's like a wet noodle. I watched an Azek youtube video and they used special heat blankets and theirs was just as flexible.

We placed the trim in our jig and let it cool. One thing I would've done different on our jig is the form. We used small blocks screwed to the radius line we drew. Bending the heated piece around the blocks created small indents in the trim. To improve it I would've added a continuous luan or aluminum strip attached to the blocks to avoid the indents. They sanded out ok, but it could've been avoided.
 

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overanalyze said:
This would've worked great for that. It needs even temperature across the whole piece. They want the pvc to be 280-290 degrees. We bought some 6" oval ducting and a couple adapters/reducers. We bought a small piece of cheap pvc to experiment on first before doing the final pieces. Fired up our torpedo heater and slid in the trim. We let one in there a little to long and the end closest to the heater got a little burnt, but we allowed for plenty of waste on the ends. When it's ready, it's like a wet noodle. I watched an Azek youtube video and they used special heat blankets and theirs was just as flexible. We placed the trim in our jig and let it cool. One thing I would've done different on our jig is the form. We used small blocks screwed to the radius line we drew. Bending the heated piece around the blocks created small indents in the trim. To improve it I would've added a continuous luan or aluminum strip attached to the blocks to avoid the indents. They sanded out ok, but it could've been avoided.
Thanks a bunch. Any way of telling what the temperature is in the pvc?

I formed mine by clamping it to the old wood bridge mould. Talk about indents... Lol. Live and learn.
 

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Always Learning
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks a bunch. Any way of telling what the temperature is in the pvc?

I formed mine by clamping it to the old wood bridge mould. Talk about indents... Lol. Live and learn.
A temperature gun or electric thermometer with a probe you can stick in the end. I will admit we just waited until it was noodle like. We will add the thermometer if we do more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We got one installed today. We put blocking in before we installed the soffit. We drilled the back for pocket screws every 12". Tucked it right behind the fascia line.
 

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Always Learning
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
very nicely done:thumbsup:look like they fit better than alot of the fypon iv'e put up
Thanks Tom! I know what you mean. I have had to taper the top of the fypon ones before to get them to fit. These had a little gap at the bottom but we were able to pull it snug.
 
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