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The brick is pretty bad here. The whole building is brick and shares both side walls with other stores. The building had a fire in it about 6 years ago. The fire was contained to the back of the building and only really damaged some lumber walls and part of the second story floor. The building has sat abandoned since the fire. There are a couple of of widows not bored up. This place is full of pigeons. The roof seems sound and I can't find any water damage leaking in the building at all. I'm in West Tennessee and its pretty high humidity and rains all the time.

As you can see from the pictures there are piles of brick dust near these damaged walls. There are three spots noticeable on the North East Wall. The other walls don't seem to have this issue. Also, there is plaster and stucco over much of the walls. We plan to tear it all down to expose the brick. Talked to a neighbor and he was told the walls are 3 bricks deep (thickness between stores). Does this sound right?
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What causes this?

What is the best course of action for repairs?

I will be calling around to get quotes here in a few weeks; figured I would put here to see if anyone has had a similar situation.
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Hey Andy, don’t piss any of us hillbillies off now. But since I’ve been in Tx. so long now I guess I can let op in on it. Them thar ol shiners pissed in that thar wall while they was a brewing up a run of shine. Being masons was just a front. That’s why she’s a crumblin

Mike
 

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Before this gets shut down.

One thing is you will need to have a hazmat team clean it up.

No contractor will have his crew work in that. Pigeon poo carries a lot of dangerous bacteria and viruses. Especially concentrated like that.

And just a mop and bucket won't do the trick.

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The cause is moisture. Years ago interior bricks were the poor quality ones from the kiln. Better ones were used for the facework. Nowadays with different methods of brick making inside common bricks are produced to a higher standard.
In this case the damaged bricks need replacing, luckily it's a 13 inch wall.
Don't know about the USA, but here since the 90's there is a thing called the Party wall act. Preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)
In short you need to let next door know about the work.
 

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There are ways to stabilize that brick.

Call a Historical Mason or get ahold of a local historical society. Very specialized, but worth it.

It's been a while, but there are some mesh systems that may work. IIRC, there are some that would even make it quake proof.

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