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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am installing crown moulding in a bedroom. 13 x 13 . i plan to cope the inside corners. i plan to put coped end to but cut, coped end to but cut and so on so that i will not have to cope a 13 foot length on both ends. turns out this seens to be imposible . how do i deal with having to cut two miters on on length. i was told this would be imposible to get the right fit. :eek:
 

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You should have:

1 Piece w/ no coped ends
2 Pieces w/ 1 coped end
1 Piece w/ 2 coped ends

If you plan to cope that s really the only way. Just cope both ends of your last piece, make sure its cut just a hair long (1/8th in 13ft should be fine), and flex it into place.

That's how I've always done it, never had any problems.
 

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I rarely, if ever, cope two ends. For what??

The first piece I install (only temporarily), is a 10 or 12" 'starter piece, - - my next piece gets 'coped' into that one, - - and installed along that whole wall, - - then I cope each wall around the room into the previous wall, - - when I get to the last wall, I remove the 'starter' and 'slide' the butt-end of my last piece behind the 'cope', - - FAST, EASY, PRECISE. :Thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
that is a great solution. thank you very much

Tom R said:
I rarely, if ever, cope two ends. For what??

The first piece I install (only temporarily), is a 10 or 12" 'starter piece, - - my next piece gets 'coped' into that one, - - and installed along that whole wall, - - then I cope each wall around the room into the previous wall, - - when I get to the last wall, I remove the 'starter' and 'slide' the butt-end of my last piece behind the 'cope', - - FAST, EASY, PRECISE. :Thumbs:
great idea thank you very much you are trully a pro and this is a great web site
 

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Tom R said:
I rarely, if ever, cope two ends. For what??

The first piece I install (only temporarily), is a 10 or 12" 'starter piece, - - my next piece gets 'coped' into that one, - - and installed along that whole wall, - - then I cope each wall around the room into the previous wall, - - when I get to the last wall, I remove the 'starter' and 'slide' the butt-end of my last piece behind the 'cope', - - FAST, EASY, PRECISE. :Thumbs:

You're still making 4 copes either way you do it. Putting up a "starter" piece, then removing it, then reinstalling it sounds like WAY more of a hassle then just coping one piece twice.

To each his own I guess.
 

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No installation necessary, - - the cope holds it by itself.

To remove, - - just slide it out.

Coping one end only of each piece simply decreases the odds of a mistake.

Not trying to tell anyone what to do, - - just offering a solution.
 

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PPro said:
You're still making 4 copes either way you do it. Putting up a "starter" piece, then removing it, then reinstalling it sounds like WAY more of a hassle then just coping one piece twice.

To each his own I guess.
Yes you are, but the difference is you are making 1 cope on each piece of crown with flexibility on the exact length, avoiding the possibility of 2 copes on one piece of crown which also involves cutting it to size with 2 copes perfectly which is really the hardest part of it.
 

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Good, glad to hear it, - - it works real well, - - I strongly suggest it to everyone. Except PPro, whose apparently already got 'his' system down to a science, - - no problem, - - if it ain't broke, don't fix it, right??
 

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Not to take this thread in a different direction, but how many guys here buy carpentry books and read them? A good finish carpentry book covers most of these methods, the information is available to anybody willing to take the time to read it and become better at their trade.

The passing on of information in contracting almost seems like it has to come verbally or on the job or it isn't considered valid. Is there a pervasive attitude that if it comes out of a book it is somehow not to be taken seriously? Just curious at what others think.

Personally I have an extensive library of how to books and videos that I reference when I have a sitution that I don't deal with everyday. They prove invaluable as a source to show me exactly what needs to be done, or at worst at least a place to start and then know what to ask others about.
 

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Well as I'm sure you guys all know, if you cut the piece to be coped the length of the wall, backcut it at a 45 to expose the profile and cope away. I dont see it being any less accurate, but to each his own.

I'm sure Tom's way works well, just not the way I've learned/mastered. It all works.
 

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Not arguing your point at all, PPro, - - you're efficient at what you do and that's what's important, - - but here's another reason I like this method. I overcut the crown lengths, cope one end, and paint in my shop before I even get to the job. When I arrive I cut the butt-ends to the correct length, install, fill holes, face paint, and go for an early lunch. Customer's are braggin' to the neighbors how neat, fast and efficient you are. :Thumbs:
 

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Mike Finley said:
Not to take this thread in a different direction, but how many guys here buy carpentry books and read them? A good finish carpentry book covers most of these methods, the information is available to anybody willing to take the time to read it and become better at their trade.

The passing on of information in contracting almost seems like it has to come verbally or on the job or it isn't considered valid. Is there a pervasive attitude that if it comes out of a book it is somehow not to be taken seriously? Just curious at what others think.

Personally I have an extensive library of how to books and videos that I reference when I have a sitution that I don't deal with everyday. They prove invaluable as a source to show me exactly what needs to be done, or at worst at least a place to start and then know what to ask others about.
Couldn't agree more, Mike, - - I'm a big believer in 'extending' my knowledge base, - - here's some of my more 'basic' collection, - - I have another shelf-full (about half this amount) of my 'specialty' books.





 

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Well I aint no painter, I just put wood on the walls. :)

I'm not arguing either. Thats just the way I was taught, so thats what I do. Sounds like we both get the same results anyway.
 

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i agree

Mike Finley said:
Not to take this thread in a different direction, but how many guys here buy carpentry books and read them? A good finish carpentry book covers most of these methods, the information is available to anybody willing to take the time to read it and become better at their trade.

The passing on of information in contracting almost seems like it has to come verbally or on the job or it isn't considered valid. Is there a pervasive attitude that if it comes out of a book it is somehow not to be taken seriously? Just curious at what others think.

Personally I have an extensive library of how to books and videos that I reference when I have a sitution that I don't deal with everyday. They prove invaluable as a source to show me exactly what needs to be done, or at worst at least a place to start and then know what to ask others about.
nothing wrong with researching a book,i read books all the time ,finding new ideas and methods keeps you sharp ,and i might add,sometimes it keeps you from screwing alot of things up.we all might know alot but we don't know everything,i can build furniture,kitchen cabinets,do framing,plumbing,wire a house ,do any trim,doors,sidding,roofing,fencing,but i still don't know everything,i research books and the internet and find lots of useful information to hone my craft,something new to learn everyday. :Thumbs:
 

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Mike Finley said:
Not to take this thread in a different direction, but how many guys here buy carpentry books and read them? A good finish carpentry book covers most of these methods, the information is available to anybody willing to take the time to read it and become better at their trade.
By the way, though I read a lot of books, the crown molding method I mentioned above wasn't out of one, - - nor have I ever seen anyone else ever use this method, - - it's just been one of my own 'self-taught' methods, - - I'm not saying it's not possibly out there, - - but I would be very interested for anyone to mention where it might be seen in a book.

Years ago, - - I once wrote an 'original' (short-) cutting method that went in 'handy hints' of 'The Family Handyman' magazine, - - again, - - not saying someone else hadn't already figured it out, - - but obviously at least 'they' thought it was original enough to pay me for it.

I'll try and dig it up.
 

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Tom R said:
By the way, though I read a lot of books, the crown molding method I mentioned above wasn't out of one, - - nor have I ever seen anyone else ever use this method, - - it's just been one of my own 'self-taught' methods, - - I'm not saying it's not possibly out there, - - but I would be very interested for anyone to mention where it might be seen in a book.
I've seen your method mentioned in a handful of places, but I'm the odd ball because I have an extensive library like yourself, if you have the book "The Best Of Fine Homebuilding Finish Carpentry" one of the books by Taunton Press in the For Pros By Pros series you can see it demonstrated in a picture on the top of page 53 in an article by Tom Law that originally ran in Fine Homebuilding back in 1989.

I've used that method a few times myself, but have gravitated back to starting with the full butt piece and ending with the double cope. After getting good at coping I don't find it such a big deal anymore to do the double cope, but I appreciate the other method just the same.
 
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