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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got rained out today right as I got to a tough spot. Maybe one of you guys could help me out before I spend monday morning racking my brain.

I am putting Azek crown on the rakes of a house we are siding. I have a spot where two 8 pitch gabels come together. So the crown needs to come down each roof, and miter at the corner.

I haven't played with it yet, but what I think I need to do is put the crown in the saw with the 52 side against the fence, then set the miter at 33.69.

What do you guys think, anyone here ever done this?
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Just set the saw at 33.7º and nest the crown upside down in the saw and cut it. Do the same for the other pc with the miter angle on the other side of 0
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was thinking about it this morning, and that won't work.
That is how I cut for the peaks of a gable. Here I am coming around a 90.
The point where the crown meets is the bottom of the valley.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Need a picture to clarify what you are trying to do. Or a drawing might do.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Need a picture to clarify what you are trying to do. Or a drawing might do.
Leo. I think his two 8/12 planes are coming in at 90 deg from each other.

A gable from the side of the house meeting one in the front with a valley at the corner.

His crown needs to be cut down in that low spot at the valley.

I think you can still nest the crown at the spring angle on the saw. miter it for the 8/12 and bevel it at 45 fro the turn.

Kinda a double compound miter but not really.:whistling
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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If he wants the crown to be in the correct orientation all around the roof he is going to need some double miters to correct for the turning angles. Otherwise he will have crown in the almost horizontal position on the eaves.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Me thinks you are over thinking this.

His two pieces of facia have 8/12 plum cuts with a 45 deg bevel. Simple enough for the facia.

Add in the crown. Use the same cutting theory. 8/12 plum cut with a 45 deg bevel only nest it on the fence
 

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KemoSabe
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Me thinks you are over thinking this.

His two pieces of facia have 8/12 plum cuts with a 45 deg bevel. Simple enough for the facia.

Add in the crown. Use the same cutting theory. 8/12 plum cut with a 45 deg bevel only nest it on the fence
Without a dual bevel miter saw, you're in for a few small piles of hair on the floor. I would nest the crown, set the bevel for the 8/12, 45 on the angle and keep a sense of humor. I recommend a couple test pieces to dial in the miter.:thumbsup:
 

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KemoSabe
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If you dont have a dual bevel saw, cut the piece that works with your saw, then use it as a template to set your saw to flat cut the opposing piece. There you go, no hair being pulled out either.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Leo. I think his two 8/12 planes are coming in at 90 deg from each other.

A gable from the side of the house meeting one in the front with a valley at the corner.

His crown needs to be cut down in that low spot at the valley.

I think you can still nest the crown at the spring angle on the saw. miter it for the 8/12 and bevel it at 45 fro the turn.

Kinda a double compound miter but not really.:whistling
This is exactly the situation gus.

I do have a dual compund saw, but if I nest it, then set the mitre at an 8/12, and the bevel at 45 it is no good(messed around with that this morning.

I am thinking I need to nest the crown, make my plumb cut, then lay the crown flat set the miter to match the angle, and try a 45 bevel at that angle. I am not sure how this will work, but we will see. :whistling
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Without a dual bevel miter saw, you're in for a few small piles of hair on the floor. I would nest the crown, set the bevel for the 8/12, 45 on the angle and keep a sense of humor. I recommend a couple test pieces to dial in the miter.:thumbsup:
Ah I mis read this. I was setting the miter for 8/12, and the bevel for a 45. Like I would the 1X rake.
Thanks, I'll try this to.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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If you dont have a dual bevel saw, cut the piece that works with your saw, then use it as a template to set your saw to flat cut the opposing piece. There you go, no hair being pulled out either.:thumbsup:
There you go again, thinking all the possibilities through. Why you so smart anyway? I know you went to NJ schools.:laughing:

I got another idea if you don't have a duel bevel saw.

Give Chris G a call and go on a shopping date together. He is gonna buy himself a new skil saw.

What do ya think Lone? Are you ready to hit the dating circuit if it involves tools?
 

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KemoSabe
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There you go again, thinking all the possibilities through. Why you so smart anyway? I know you went to NJ schools.:laughing:

I got another idea if you don't have a duel bevel saw.

Give Chris G a call and go on a shopping date together. He is gonna buy himself a new skil saw.

What do ya think Lone? Are you ready to hit the dating circuit if it involves tools?
If I could find a woman that shares my perversion for tools, I'd have a soulmate.:laughing:
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Maybe Chris is a girl.

cover all the possibilities
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Crown on rakes and eaves gets interesting. IMO, it works best if the rafter tails are not plumb cut but rather cut at 90* from the roof pitch. This allows the rake to eave outside 90* corner to be normal outside 45* cut.

This does mean the crown on the angled rafter tails has an effective spring angle that is the sum of the crown spring angle (often 38*) and the roof pitch (36.69* in this case) for a total spring angle of 71.69*.

The trick is getting the miter where two pieces of crown with effective spring angles of 71.69* meet at the the inside corner of the two intersecting gables.

I plugged in 90* for the inside corner (wall angle) and 71.69* for the spring angle and got 43.51* (miter) and 12.83* (bevel)... with this calculator:

http://www.construction-resource.com/calculators/crown-molding.php

I have also cut crown for jobs like this face down with a jig holding the front edge of the crown (top of crown) up 18* and the bottom edge of the crown against the fence. This is true "in position" cutting... with out the upside-down and backwards part. This is only safe for very large effective spring angles... so the crown is almost laying flat and supported by a jig.

I wish I took pictures of this process, but here are some pics from the last job I did like this:
 

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Sometimes it's easier to just hold one piece over the other, mark their intersections and this will give you the cuts for both pieces.

I'll do this if I only have a couple to do and I'm in a hurry. :whistling
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Sometimes it's easier to just hold one piece over the other, mark their intersections and this will give you the cuts for both pieces.

I'll do this if I only have a couple to do and I'm in a hurry. :whistling
That works for finding odd angles for a miter if the trim is flat (in the same plane), but for crown with compound angles laying two pieces over each other and marking the intersection is not too helpful at getting both the miter and bevel settings for cutting crown flat and in this case you can't just make marks and cut the crown "in position" because the effective spring angle is rather extreme... so no nesting at normal spring angles.

Hope that makes sense.

All the best,

Bass
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well, I lucked out.
I wasn't there when the guys took the gutters, and old crown down. There used to be a small gutter around the corner. The crown came down the rake, and was cut level above the gutter.
 
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