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Painter/Rehaber
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have you ever worked on one of those old houses and thought about the original crew that built the house or the tools they had to use?

Imagine being the rookie on a construction crew in 1915. The boss hands you a hammer and a bag of nails and points over to several skids filled with lathe.

Boss says, "Son, I need this lathe installed by next week. Start on the upstairs bedroom ceiling. Make sure there is 1/4" gap in between each board and 2 nails in every joist and stud. Now get busy. Plaster crew arrives on Monday".

That was a lot of fu***** hard work. Do you think those crews wined like young folks today or do you think they were just happy to have a job and an opportunity to learn a trade?
 

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KemoSabe
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We hand nailed everything the first 3 or 4 years I was in new construction. Frame and sheath, trimwork, cedar siding, roofing, decks. All hand work. Been using guns for the last 20 years or so. Still beats an air-conditioned office and a suit and tie.:thumbsup:
 
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I seen a Discovery channel special on bulding the pyramids. That's a lot of hard work. They still cut stone like that in Egypt today. Those stone masons need a visit from a Husqvarna sales rep. Get those boys a saw.
 

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Painter/Rehaber
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I seen a Discovery channel special on bulding the pyramids. That's a lot of hard work. They still cut stone like that in Egypt today. Those stone masons need a visit from a Husqvarna sales rep. Get those boys a saw.

No. Can't do that. Give them power tools then their going to want to go union and posibly women who bathe.
 

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strat hd
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The first job I had banging nails was outside Gillette Wyoming in 1980. I worked for a slip form silo building company. There were going to be two silo job's about about fifty miles apart from each other.

A building needed to be built to soak the staves in an oil tank for the slip forms. The building was about the size of a three car garage. First day the boss pulls up starts unloading tools. No power saws, no generator just handsaws. Someone said would'nt this be easier with a generator and power saws ? Boss said you ***holes need to learn how to use a handsaw before you can use a powersaw.

So we built the place with no power. Built trusses using a jig with plywood for the gussets. I think my right arm is still bigger than my left. :laughing:

The silo's ended up being 220' tall 70' in diameter. The concrete pour per silo lasted 13 straight days, two 12 hr shifts. The concrete was craned up and dumped into a hopper in the center of the floating slip form. Then we loaded concrete into a georgie buggy and dumped it into the 20'' wide form. Hope I never see another georgie buggy (very large wheelbarrow).
 

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That old house was probably built by a bunch of "immigrants" who were happy as hell to have a good paying job and to be here in america.
Funny how some things don't change.
 

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The first job I had banging nails was outside Gillette Wyoming in 1980. I worked for a slip form silo building company. There were going to be two silo job's about about fifty miles apart from each other.

A building needed to be built to soak the staves in an oil tank for the slip forms. The building was about the size of a three car garage. First day the boss pulls up starts unloading tools. No power saws, no generator just handsaws. Someone said would'nt this be easier with a generator and power saws ? Boss said you ***holes need to learn how to use a handsaw before you can use a powersaw.

So we built the place with no power. Built trusses using a jig with plywood for the gussets. I think my right arm is still bigger than my left. :laughing:

The silo's ended up being 220' tall 70' in diameter. The concrete pour per silo lasted 13 straight days, two 12 hr shifts. The concrete was craned up and dumped into a hopper in the center of the floating slip form. Then we loaded concrete into a georgie buggy and dumped it into the 20'' wide form. Hope I never see another georgie buggy (very large wheelbarrow).
That boss wasn't named Lloyd was it? My first construction job was a grain elevator like that , 6.00 an hour I learned alot from that old codger though
 

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semi-skilled laborer
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That old house was probably built by a bunch of "immigrants" who were happy as hell to have a good paying job and to be here in america.
Funny how some things don't change.
It has changed, the immigrants now are illegal, soak up welfare, dont pay taxes, dont care to contribute and become a part of this country but instead have the country accomadate them. Dont even compare the immigrants of the old days with the cockroaches we have here now.
 

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Found 3 silver dollars on top of a door header while remodeling a house built in the 20's, probably lunch money for a whole week huh? Bet whatever carpenter set them there drove himself crazy looking for them.
Gave them to the HO who puts them back for his kids.
 

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aint that the truth

It has changed, the immigrants now are illegal, soak up welfare, dont pay taxes, dont care to contribute and become a part of this country but instead have the country accomadate them. Dont even compare the immigrants of the old days with the cockroaches we have here now.


well said.:clap:
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Boss says, "Son, I need this lathe installed by next week. Start on the upstairs bedroom ceiling. Make sure there is 1/4" gap in between each board and 2 nails in every joist and stud. Now get busy. Plaster crew arrives on Monday".

Actually, the lathe for a whole house was done in one day--two guys. Two nails per stud/joist? Not in any of the houses I've torn apart.
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
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I know i have posted this before but this gives you some idea on how it used to be!
I found this nailled to the deck of a lead covered church bell tower, when we replaced it, with lead of course, we left a copy of this and our own letter.
Cheers
Dave
 

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It has changed, the immigrants now are illegal, soak up welfare, dont pay taxes, dont care to contribute and become a part of this country but instead have the country accomadate them. Dont even compare the immigrants of the old days with the cockroaches we have here now.
Yup damn right!!


Dave
 

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Painter/Rehaber
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Actually, the lathe for a whole house was done in one day--two guys.


Yea. Sure it was. And I'm sure the same two guys had all the hardwood flooring installed (and trimmed out) the following day. :no:
 

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Curmudgeon
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Actually, the lathe for a whole house was done in one day--two guys.


Yea. Sure it was. And I'm sure the same two guys had all the hardwood flooring installed (and trimmed out) the following day. :no:
Lathers were fast.
Do you know much about
what they did, and how?
Ever seen a real lather's hatchet?
 

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Painter/Rehaber
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Actually, the lathe for a whole house was done in one day--two guys. Two nails per stud/joist? Not in any of the houses I've torn apart.
Lathers were fast.
Do you know much about
what they did, and how?
Ever seen a real lather's hatchet?

No. What is a lathers hatchet. A hammer like instrument I suppose. Got pics.

I can only imagine how they went about things. I am sure they were quite efficient as efficienty is important in all trades.
 

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I started out hand nailing every thing, still prefer to hand nail certain things(rafters and roof trusses, enough sinkers in headers, lvl ect... to ensure they pull together tight). That being said:I never had it rough compared to the old boy in Maryland who once told me that as a young man he spent all winter in his father's shop using a brace&bit to drill peg holes for post & beam barns.
If he was caught up he was "allowed" to help w/mortice & tennon joints using a handsaw & chisel.
They used a draw knife and a hand plane to sqare up cured logs for beams.
Makes me feel kinda guilty for rolling up if the power goes down.
 
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