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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did the whole house in grey, pour in place concrete. The main island was 57 sq feet, all seamless, and 2" thick face. I'd like to see granite guys do that.









Just after stripping edge and troweling.



Black with recycled glass and copper flake. Its hard to see.

 

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Always wanted to put one in my home, I like the look of concrete with glass chips better than any marble or granite I've seen.
 

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Is it real tricky to do? I've looked into doing them but they scare me a little bit. I have done concrete work and counter tops but never mixed the two.
 

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Love it! I have only done one pour in place. Do you like it better than pre-cast? How does the surface compare smoothness wise?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys.

Stevearino, they arent real tricky, but its important everything is dead nuts level and as straight as possible. Obviously it will mirror every little jog in the form.

Overanalyze, I really prefer to do pour in place as much as possible. Less work, and not nearly as messy. With precast you have to grind and polish. That means getting wet, and a lot of hours using the grinder. Its nice to do some super custom stuff that way, like inlaid objects or fiber optics, but day to day I'd like to do pour in place.

The smoothness is close to the same, but obviously with a hand troweled top you still have some small marks left over. Nothing that cant be lightly sanded though, and we leave alot of the smaller things in to add the the character of it. We generally spend 10 hours at the house the day we pour. Most of that is troweling, waiting, troweling, and waiting, and troweling. A lot of phases of troweling lol. Its not like a driveway where you bull float it and broom it.
 

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6stringmason said:
Thanks guys. Stevearino, they arent real tricky, but its important everything is dead nuts level and as straight as possible. Obviously it will mirror every little jog in the form. Overanalyze, I really prefer to do pour in place as much as possible. Less work, and not nearly as messy. With precast you have to grind and polish. That means getting wet, and a lot of hours using the grinder. Its nice to do some super custom stuff that way, like inlaid objects or fiber optics, but day to day I'd like to do pour in place. The smoothness is close to the same, but obviously with a hand troweled top you still have some small marks left over. Nothing that cant be lightly sanded though, and we leave alot of the smaller things in to add the the character of it. We generally spend 10 hours at the house the day we pour. Most of that is troweling, waiting, troweling, and waiting, and troweling. A lot of phases of troweling lol. Its not like a driveway where you bull float it and broom it.
What kind of concert do you have to use? Is there mesh inside or fibers? I really want to try them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What kind of concert do you have to use? Is there mesh inside or fibers? I really want to try them.
No mesh or fibers. We pour very dry to reduce shrinkage and cracking, and use some reinforment in the form.

Our tops are pour in place, but if they need to be removed, nothing except the actual bottom of form is secured to the cabinets. Our reinforcement is laid in after the first layer of concrete is put down followed by the remaining concrete to height.
 

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6stringmason said:
No mesh or fibers. We pour very dry to reduce shrinkage and cracking, and use some reinforment in the form. Our tops are pour in place, but if they need to be removed, nothing except the actual bottom of form is secured to the cabinets. Our reinforcement is laid in after the first layer of concrete is put down followed by the remaining concrete to height.
How do finish the edges if there is plywood or something at the bottom? Just regular concrete mix?

Also sorry I'm asking so many questions just really interested. I understand if you don't want to give away certain trade secrets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
How do finish the edges if there is plywood or something at the bottom? Just regular concrete mix?

Also sorry I'm asking so many questions just really interested. I understand if you don't want to give away certain trade secrets.
you bevel the form 3/4" from the finished edge, the screw another piece from the bottom that hangs past the beveled edge another 3/4". Then you screw the sides of the form to that bottom piece.

Youre able to safely remove the sides to trowel them, and the bottom piece is safely removable the following day.
 

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6stringmason said:
you bevel the form 3/4" from the finished edge, the screw another piece from the bottom that hangs past the beveled edge another 3/4". Then you screw the sides of the form to that bottom piece. Youre able to safely remove the sides to trowel them, and the bottom piece is safely removable the following day.
Sweet that's awesome thanks so much for the tips. I'm going to try it next time I do a countertop on one of my properties so I can experiment with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Last question haha what do you use to glaze it at the end?
HA! Thats one thing I dont give out to easily lol. Theres a lot of sealers on the market, you have to find what works best for your needs.
 
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