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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I could use a reminder on how to do a couple crown moulding inside corners at 135. This is over a kitchen corner cabinet. How do you get that 67.5 again (for coping). Thanks.

Edit: I think I got it. Install the "long 45", then cut the other at 22.5....right?
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Ditto on the preassemble.

I have preassembled several pieces of crown with great success when applying it to cabinetry.

Back nailing the inside corners is a wonderful thing. Much easier than coping Prefinished crown

The sub top on the base cabinets makes for a nice work bench and scaffold too.
 
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Xtrememtnbiker said:
I know a lot of you work solo. How would you go about installing a pre assembled section that had long pieces going both ways?
you could bend a couple pieces of aluminum to hook over the top of the cbt and loops back up to hold the crown, put some felt on it to protect the finish. That's how I would do it. There's an article Gary Katz did that showed what I'm talking about.
 

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I know a lot of you work solo. How would you go about installing a pre assembled section that had long pieces going both ways?
Solo has its limits.

But on a framed cabinet, I install the crown with the doors off and can clamp a block to the top rail at the bottom of the crown. Then you can rest it on the blocks while you maneuver yourself into position.
 

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If your going to cope the fit, try clipping the 1st pc so as to have the coped piece only cover by about 3/16 or so. That way the level portions of the cope are easier to deal with. It's the level ( or near level) portions of a cope that almost always cause fit problems.

As an example, it's easier to explain clip cut on a 90 degree corner. Normally, you'd cut 1st piece at 90deg, then cut 2nd at 45, & cope. To do clip cut, you miter 1st piece leaving a little of the square cut, so that the 2nd pice only cover about 3/16 of the surface covered.

This works great on bstd profiles that have large area of a cope that approach being level.
Joe
 

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Gus Dering said:
Solo has its limits. But on a framed cabinet, I install the crown with the doors off and can clamp a block to the top rail at the bottom of the crown. Then you can rest it on the blocks while you maneuver yourself into position.
I don't work solo. But I usually am installing the cabinets more or less solo sometimes with a helper and trimming is almost always solo. Other guys always on site to help. That is a very helpful trick Gus. Thanks.
 

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Railman said:
If your going to cope the fit, try clipping the 1st pc so as to have the coped piece only cover by about 3/16 or so. That way the level portions of the cope are easier to deal with. It's the level ( or near level) portions of a cope that almost always cause fit problems.

As an example, it's easier to explain clip cut on a 90 degree corner. Normally, you'd cut 1st piece at 90deg, then cut 2nd at 45, & cope. To do clip cut, you miter 1st piece leaving a little of the square cut, so that the 2nd pice only cover about 3/16 of the surface covered.

This works great on bstd profiles that have large area of a cope that approach being level.
Joe
Joe,

I've never seen or heard of this technique until now. That's pure genius. Did you figure that out on your own or did someone pass it in to you?

And I agree, some moulding is just un-copeable.

Thanks for the tip.



To the original post:

That joint you are talking about, I would miter instead of coping. It will work on your saw in position. Remember, zero on the miter saw is already cutting ninety.
 

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B.Scott,
I just figured it out on my own, on a job with near impossible copes. It was also a big crown stain job. It ended up working out looking good.
Thanks;),
Joe
 
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