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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, as stupid as it does sound!

We hired a new carpenter at work this week, and got into a discussion on a coping saw. WHAT way do you all put the blade in? To cut on a pull up stroke, from the back to face, or the push down stroke from the face to the back?

I do the push, down from the face to the back.
 

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Push to cut. It leaves a cleaner finish, it's easier to hold material against cut bench, & uses weight of arm & saw to an advantage, instead of disadvantage.

Having said that, you have to have a strong frame, & very good blades of the proper pitch to cut on the push.
 

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American blades cut on the push stroke.I like to use Japenese saws for cutting joinery because they cut on the pull stroke and are much easier to control.
When coping molding these days I use an older Bosch jig saw that is very smooth cutting and does a fine job.I don't even use a fine blade with it.Find it does better for coping with a 14 tpi blade.You have to be careful as it is aggressive but will be quick and does a clean cut.
 

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I was about to launch into a sarcastic rant,
But decided against it.

http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/medias/sys_master/712517_01_P_WE_8.jpg

As mentioned before, the Japanese style has more to do with the blade tooth shape and orientation than it does the saw itself.
Don't know why you would go on a rant.I own and use many Japanese saws.Just have never seen a Japanese coping saw.Sure there were some out there.Would like more information than just that online pic with no link?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Push to cut. It leaves a cleaner finish, it's easier to hold material against cut bench, & uses weight of arm & saw to an advantage, instead of disadvantage.

Having said that, you have to have a strong frame, & very good blades of the proper pitch to cut on the push.
Where in the hell can you find them in today's world? Good quality, just not in the market place anymore!!
 

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There are places like Woodcraft and Rockler that have them but they are not the same quality they used to be and are expensive.I'm glad I have several good ones bought 20 or so years ago.Like every thing else ,good quality just not the same.
I just never thought about looking for a Japanese coping saw then.
 

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Push also.

Anybody know of a saw on the market with a good strong frame? The old Craftsman with the square hoop and threads on the handle and far end was my long time favorite and they no longer carry them.
I was looking at a Bahco coping saw the other day. I almost bought it to replace my rarely used chi-com buck brothers. I hate that saw.

From the looks of it. Looked pretty solid and will do 360 degrees. German made tooling. Definitely will be going back to get that saw. Didn't have all my tool buying cash on me that day. Best part was under 20 bucks.
 

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mako1 said:
Don't know why you would go on a rant.I own and use many Japanese saws.Just have never seen a Japanese coping saw.Sure there were some out there.Would like more information than just that online pic with no link?
I have never seen one either...

More to the point of "it's about the blade, not the saw".

The spiral toothed blade the "scroll saw" guys use kinda makes the pull vs. push debate, moot.

Don't know if they make that blade for the "western" coping saw frame.
 

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What am I missing? I've always cut from the back, on the pull stroke, with a coping saw. Don't the teeth point towards the handle on all coping saws?
I have always done coping on the push stroke. That way I can place the material on the bench, just off of the edge and have a nice solid backing for the stroke.

Andy.
 
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