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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was walking through a parking lot last week and I saw this on the back of a cube can... It's a steel roller that can be used in the trailer recover.



image-3800140924.jpg



It got me thinking that it's be nice to add to the rear of long trailers... It would be better that screwing up my trailer and a clients driveway.

Any thoughts?
 

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That's my friends truck! When he bought the truck we built out the interior with Birch ply shelves and doors. Then we transferred all the tools and materials from his smaller previous truck to the new one. Because the truck box extends lower than the chassis and extends beyond the axle, the rear step bumper is low. Going in and out of some driveways the hitch would rub to the point of wearing away the bottom. He bought the wheel from an r/v site and his cousin made the rest. It protects the receiver hitch from scraping but it will do a number on the driveway. If the drive is really steep, I'll stand behind the truck with a piece of ply to protect the driveway. I think the next course of action is getting rear air bags to help with ride and to raise the truck when needed to get clearance. I have a similar problem with extending my lift gate if the driveway is angled the wrong way.
 

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There's a problem with this. If your hit is so low its hitting the ground because of the step incline then you have to watch the rear of the trailer if you lift the hitch because it could dig the rear of the trailer into the drive. Some people have said put a wheels at the rear of the trailer but then your putting thousands of pounds onto a couple of tinny metal wheels and they will gouged your driveway out.
 

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There's a problem with this. If your hit is so low its hitting the ground because of the step incline then you have to watch the rear of the trailer if you lift the hitch because it could dig the rear of the trailer into the drive. Some people have said put a wheels at the rear of the trailer but then your putting thousands of pounds onto a couple of tinny metal wheels and they will gouged your driveway out.
You realize that is on the hitch of the truck and no trailer is involved?

Most of those wheels are solid steel, I know mine is. Never gouged a driveway/street yet, if driveway is too steep it still is possible to loose traction. Those steep ones I park on the street. Still much better than the pc of melamine I used before.
 

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rrk said:
You realize that is on the hitch of the truck and no trailer is involved? Most of those wheels are solid steel, I know mine is. Never gouged a driveway/street yet, if driveway is too steep it still is possible to loose traction. Those steep ones I park on the street. Still much better than the pc of melamine I used before.
I thought it was that thread about stopping the trailers gouging the drives. oh well ignore my comment about the trailer hitting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bc is right... I didn't think of that. Those tiny wheels would destroy a driveway.

Do you think laying down plywood would help the wheels from digging in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Curt Boyer said:
We use plywood strips under the wheel to protect the sidewalk and driveway. It works fine although it's a two man job, driver and spotter.
We once had a steep driveway to get into.., realized at the last second that the trailer was going to hit.

So my helper jumped of and laid some 2x4's on the ground under the rear corners... Unfortunately the trailer dug into the 2x's and then they dug into the payment. Didn't really help our situation too much. Ended up just parking on the street...
 
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