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What is the proper way to write these out in a contract? It's needed when you are submitting a bid but are not sure of what all needs to be done until you start demolitioning, i.e water damage jobs, the drywall has visible damage but you don't know what the framing underneath looks like, so you don't know if the framing has to be replaced or not.

I am in the process of doing a water damage bid caused by a frozen pipe burst, and basically for drywall I have Remove and Replace 645 SF of wall, 136 SF of ceiling. Which is a definite thing that needs to be done, because it has either visible damage or is fairly close to the source of the water damage.

For an allowance I have Remove and Replace 90 SF of wall, 119 SF of ceiling. This is stuff that probably doesn't have to be done because it is far away from the source of the broken pipe and there is no visible damage. But I won't know for sure until I start demolitioning. Then I have 61 LF of wall framing that may or may not need to be replaced, won't know until I tear the drywall off and can see it. But I am thinking it will be fine because the pipe didn't break that long ago, so it shouldn't have had enough time to cause significant wood rot or mold to the framing.
 

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Nest Home Improvement
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890 Posts
Word your contract's scope of work very specifically like remove and replace x number of square feet of y item at this price. List those out line by line for everything you can see that needs to be repaired. Have a conversation with the property owner so they understand that there maybe additional items that you have to repair after the project starts that you are unable to see until you start.

Also, have an exclusion clause in your contract like 'Exclusions: Unless specified in scope of work, this agreement does not include labor or materials for any additional work. It further excludes any costs associated with the repair or remediation of hidden damages. Hidden damages may include, a hidden, concealed or unforeseeable condition not discovered during the estimating process.'
 

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Contractor
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the scope of work included in your contracct should be worded so that it describes that you are doing x, y and z for whatever sum. So, "for $xxxx.00, the contractor will remove ~645sqft of wall board on the north west bedroom walls on the north, south and east walls, install new 1/2" standard wall board and finish to a level three sheetrock finish."

the specific location is identified as is the specific task. No mention is made of electrical work, floor repair, replacement of insulation or anything else. I do not include the area in my props/contracts-my thought on the subject is I'm supplying what the customer wants-if I miscalculate by 50sqft an unhappy customer could request 50/645 of the contract price returned and may by justified in doing so because of the wording. On the other hand, I would not pursue a customer for additional monies if on my error there was 50sqft more area (695).
 

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We have an exclusion clause (similar to what carolinahandyman described)in our contract for "Concealed, Hidden and Unforeseeable Conditions" - I think it's paragraph #9234 of the contract.:laughing: In your case I would highlight it - go over it slowly with the homeowner and have him initial that paragraph specifically.

Also look at the wording 72chevy used vs. your description. Specify "wall board" not "wall". If you say "wall or Ceiling" the HO has every expectation that all the components of the "wall" are being R&R.

Good Luck!
 
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