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Discussion Starter #1
What is the proper procedure for connecting solid and stranded wire together? Say a 12 gauge solid and same size stranded.

Would it be any different for different size wires?

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If their are two solid wires they should be twisted together first, correct? Then the wire nut.

But for solid and stranded wire just a wire nut, say for installing a can light fixture. The pressure of the wire nut is sufficeint. Is this correct? Do you have a particular brand of wire nuts that you prefer to use.
 

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DGR,IABD
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Tonkadad said:
If their are two solid wires they should be twisted together first, correct? Then the wire nut.
You asked a really loaded question there, and you probably didn't realize it. The actual white papers that I've collected from wire nuts either say "conductors may be twisted or untwisted" or "pretwisting not necessary". I have yet to come across a wirenut insutruction that either requires or prohibits pretwisting . That said, I do pretwist. I have seen some DIY pretwisting that was shamefully done, and the connection would have been better off without the pretwisting mangle. Laying the conductors parallel and even, then applying the wire nut is the textbook procedure. As the wirenut is applied, it will twist the conductors automatically. This is a little hard on the wrist, which is why I pretwist.

Tonkadad said:
But for solid and stranded wire just a wire nut, say for installing a can light fixture. The pressure of the wire nut is sufficeint. Is this correct?
Yes, just a wire nut. Many wirenut instructions and most pro electricians will tell you that if you line the stripped conductor ends up and then have the stranded conductor lead the solid one by 1/8" or so, the wirenut will apply more reliably. Double check the completed connection by giving the individual conductors a tug. If you twist the strands of a stranded conductor tightly to form a more "solid" conductor, that makes things easier too. Many recessed lights have the ends of the stranded conductors pre-tinned with solder to make them terminate just as easily as solid conductors.

Tonkadad said:
Do you have a particular brand of wire nuts that you prefer to use.
Yes, the IDEAL Twisters and the Buchannan B-Caps are superior to all others. The GB Hex-loc's aren't too shabby either. You can use a tan colored twister or a red b-cap for almost all connections, as they both have a wide grip range.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks MD, as usual a thorough explanation. You kind of make feel like I have an in house Electrician. I am working on better benefits. At least you can make your own hours.
 

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I use my cordless drill quite a bit when I do makeup (saves on the wrists). The chuck will grab onto the tans without tightening and I have the tool that fits into on the drill that holds wirenuts up to a gray. Gets everything tight and speeds things up considerably.
 

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[
QUOTE=cptkinguru]I use my cordless drill quite a bit when I do makeup (saves on the wrists). The chuck will grab onto the tans without tightening and I have the tool that fits into on the drill that holds wirenuts up to a gray. Gets everything tight and speeds things up considerably.
[/QUOTE]

I'll try that. Probably do a few practice runs first.
 
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