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Discussion Starter #1
I'm moving an electric stove from one house to another need to run new cable and breaker at it's destination

The 60 degree column says 8-3 limit is 40 amps

The 75 degree column says 8-3 (THW, THWN, SE, USE, XHHW) is 50 amps

The 90 degree column with specific cable says 8-3 is 55 amps

Is the best to use 6-3 with 50 amp?

Or if stove is 12kw or less can you get by with 40 amp feed and safely stay 8-3?

8-3 is a lot cheaper than 6-3 but I'm sure you know that
 

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Most stoves we connect, cooktop and oven in one, require 50 amps.

Single oven or cooktop 30-40 amps.

Specs should be on the mameplate or paperwork
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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You need to wire it according to manufacturer specs. If they say 50 amps, then 50 it is.

In general, for what you are likely to run into, you'll always use the 60C column. Even if the wire says "90C" on it.




Delta
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The manual on line says you can use a 40 or 50 amp power cord...that's all it says. the sum of the oven, broiler and all 4 burners if on at once would be 15,700 watts. 40 amps is 8800 watts. 50 amps is 11,000 watts
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Table 220.55 of the NEC allows ranges 16 kw to be installed based on 9.6 kw. This is because of the diversity of the load. The oven is on a T-stat so it is on and off and the eyes are rarely, if ever, burning at full capacity at the same time.

If this was a cooktop then the load would be figured as the nameplate states but a range (oven &cooktop) is figured at 9.6 kw... 40 amps and #8 is all that is needed. Interestng to note that a 9kw range and a 16 kw range can both be wired with #8 and a 40 amp circuit.

It certainly won't hurt to run a #6 and use 50 amps.
 
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