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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
we are doing so very minor touch up work on the foundation of a home just below where the vinyl siding starts. its obviously 30 degree's and cold. soeone mentioned since its a very small area we can mix the concrete with hot water.. will this be ok? someone else said its impossible to do any concrete work inthe cold; however,this is a very small area.
 

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Twisted Cameron
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The smaller the piece the more likely it will freeze. Hot water will not help you unless you protect it from the elements. It has to be insulated somehow to keep the water in it from freezing. What kind of repair are you doing? Just cosmetic I hope.
 

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Project Superintendent
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Hot water won't hurt anything. It will help it set a little quicker. Is this in contact with the ground? Is the ground frozen? Can you cover it up and put some heat with it? Don't pour on frozen ground below freezing temps. And the second night can be more critical than the first. First night, assuming the chemical reactions kick in (which they won't if it's too cold), it puts out it's own heat. Second night it is still curing but chemical reactions have stopped putting out the heat.
 

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Project Superintendent
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it was just some cosmetic touch up..it had no contact with the ground.
If it's just cosmetic then the worst thing that can happen is you will have to knock it off and do it over. But your wasting your time doing a small patch in below freezing temps if you don't add auxillary heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
also, how about calcium chloride? what does that stuff look like anyway? is it mixed with the concrete?
 

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Twisted Cameron
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That is an additive, I would stay away from chloride accelerants. Something that small I would hold out till it gets warm out. Or if you can keep the temp of the material above freezing. This can be accomplished by insulation as well. But make sure the area your applying it to isn't freezing as well. This will just freeze what your putting on. Just make sure it won't freeze in the first 48 to 72 hours.
 

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ornamental plasterer
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Use a heat gun, clean a gap with alcohol, mix a thin set mortar with additive, fill a depth of the gap and use heat gun for cure, not very hot just warm. When it's cure fill a gap again with mix and use a heat gun. Two-three times procedure like that - done.
 

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Don't sweat it to much . If it the little spot under your siding .
Get some lites 500 watt .
Heat the area till about 1100 am then mix the mortar with( stay tight ) a cement additive and apply
Hang some plastic over the area then keep lights on the wall till quittin time .
When the mix is a bit hard you can cover with fiberglass insulation . leave it for 3 days . I'm building a full basement this week with a 2 story addition above on a lake we've been going in early to set up for some ice fishing :thumbup: John
 

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we are doing so very minor touch up work on the foundation of a home just below where the vinyl siding starts. its obviously 30 degree's and cold. soeone mentioned since its a very small area we can mix the concrete with hot water.. will this be ok? someone else said its impossible to do any concrete work inthe cold; however,this is a very small area.
hot water will turn cold very quickly.so tread lightly.

sound more like mental thing to me.
 

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The two important things are to warm up the wall as long as possible because the patch is so small.

Use warm mixing water (less than 140 degreesF) and do the joint patch and protect it of a day or two (at the most) with poly or add some insulation and it will be fine. Mortar will have durability as long as it can get below 7% moisture belore freezing. When it warms up it will continue to cure if moisture is available.The air temperature is not as important as the temperature of the materials (masonry units and mortar).
 

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This is for, according to my calculations, about 1/2 of a cubic inch....how bad can this possibly be? I think I need to see a picture:detective:
 

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This is for, according to my calculations, about 1/2 of a cubic inch....how bad can this possibly be? I think I need to see a picture:detective:
i couldnt agree more.if it is allowing air or moisture in and i was worried about cold.i would have caulked it or filled it with some fiberglass insulation until it warmed up.and it only being 1/8 in deep,i wouldnt think moisture or air infiltration would be that big a problem.sound like he is filling in a head joint on block.
 
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