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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always mixed concrete on site in a wheelbarrow (don't work with it much), but just sold two neighbors on 330 feet of new fence (@46 holes, w/gates & arbors).

I'm thinking that it will be cheaper (labor wise) to have my guys running the crete from the truck to the holes rather than mixing 46 80 lb bags.

But at about what point does it cross over (i.e. it's cheaper to just mix the bags on site?)
 

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Bags of concrete, X hours = cost "A"

Yards of concrete X hours = cost "B".

Here, we have to buy 3 yards, even if we need only a yard of concrete....truck minimum.
 

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We can order less than 3 yds we just pay a short charge (usually about $90). Personally I would use a line pump truck. This would cost me approx $800-$900 for what your talking about. It may be worth it to you... It may not. It all depends upon how long it would take to mix by hand and how much your paying your guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
joasis said:
Bags of concrete, X hours = cost "A"

Yards of concrete X hours = cost "B".
I understand the equation - I just don't have the experience to fill in the numbers - and was hoping to 'borrow' from someone else's experience.

I'm getting a truck for this job - but also have a small deck job (9 holes) where I'll mix onsite.

Just wondering where the cross-over is...
 

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I've always mixed concrete on site in a wheelbarrow (don't work with it much), but just sold two neighbors on 330 feet of new fence (@46 holes, w/gates & arbors).

I'm thinking that it will be cheaper (labor wise) to have my guys running the crete from the truck to the holes rather than mixing 46 80 lb bags.

But at about what point does it cross over (i.e. it's cheaper to just mix the bags on site?)
I have a fence job going right now @ 43 postholes+gates+ arbors.

To me, I would not have the concrete trucked in-- unless all holes are dug first.

I prefer to dig holes 1 by 1, then set posts and level, then drop bag of concrete in the hole, then add water to the hole. I take time to follow the mason lines and stake the gate posts for complete levelness.

With it being trucked, there must be complete coordination of your helpers so as to not rush and have the posts set too fast without being level and set at exactly 8' apart. The post are the most important part of the job. If they're not right, the finished project won't look right. Good luck.
 

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I get the straight 'cost of concrete' equation; what I was really asking was - at what point does it make more sense from a 'cost of materials AND cost of labor' standpoint to have the truck deliver it?

I.e. it's faster to have the guys run the delivered concrete to the holes from the truck rather than mix each batch - and thus cheaper to rent the truck - even if the trucked crete is more expensive (i.e. minimum purchase) than bagged (only what's needed).

Anyone looked at this?
mix the batch?

i just use the fast set bags of 'crete--you pour the dry mix in the holes, set the posts, then add water with water hose.
 

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You only use one bag of concrete per post? That's some shallow or narrow holes...

How many guys do you have? This kinda changes the equation a bit.

Take into consideration whether or not your concrete truck charges by the minute for sitting there -
Have you looked into renting an elec. mixer? You don't have to worry about truck time or min. del. charge or the time it takes your guys to hand mix.

Mac
 

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You only use one bag of concrete per post? That's some shallow or narrow holes...

How many guys do you have? This kinda changes the equation a bit.

Take into consideration whether or not your concrete truck charges by the minute for sitting there -
Have you looked into renting an elec. mixer? You don't have to worry about truck time or min. del. charge or the time it takes your guys to hand mix.

Mac
The manufacturer call for an 8" diameter hole per post. Using an 8" auger bit on a 1-2 person gas auger, it averages out to about 1.5- 1.75 bags of 'crete per hole.
 

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Building fences, I'm not quick enough, getting the fence posts lined up, and plumb, to use a constantly fed load of concrete from a truck.

I also premix all of my concrete prior to putting it in the hole, using a electric mixer or wheelbarrow. That's probably why I don't build many fences these days.
 

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The manufacturer call for an 8" diameter hole per post.
you lost me - manufacturer of what...fences?

An 8" dia. hole gives you about 2" of concrete on the sides of a 4x4 post, less if you're using 4x6s...not nearly enough support for me.
And you toss it in dry and water it down? We build differently is all I can say.

Mac
 

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you lost me - manufacturer of what...fences?

An 8" dia. hole gives you about 2" of concrete on the sides of a 4x4 post, less if you're using 4x6s...not nearly enough support for me.
And you toss it in dry and water it down? We build differently is all I can say.

Mac
4x4 posts. The manufacturer of the drymix says this in the d-i-r-e-c-t-i-o-n-s. Where do you live at where you haven't used fast set for 4x4 fence posts? Mars or maybe Jupiter?:laughing:

sot. were layin' a fence---not a deck:whistling
 

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An 8" dia. hole gives you about 2" of concrete on the sides of a 4x4 post, less if you're using 4x6s...not nearly enough support for me.
And you toss it in dry and water it down? We build differently is all I can say.
Mac
try this stuff. see the guy pouring the drymix in the hole.....


you life will go much easier now....
 

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I may open up a whole new can of worms with this one, but fences I have installed, I have used #2 crushed limestone for a post base and to surround the posts. I learned that one from a company that only builds fences. It is supposed to avoid any chance of problems with frost heave. Yes, I know dig post holes down below the frost line, but the thinking is this: Who's post holes are always perfect cylinders? Admittedly, mine often have a little bit of a cone shape, especially at the top, leaving the chance of heave. Stone would certainly eliminate the rush of setting posts / placing concrete or hand mixing bags. See this pics on this link to see what I'm getting at. I have seen this concept addressed on line on several different websites in the past, but this was the only one I could find today. (Alapaca's...what???) BTW, 1st time poster, short time reader from southeast michigan also. Don't beat me up too bad!
 

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Ooops...the link...

it wouldn't let me put the link in due to being too new...it's gatewayalapacas.com for those who really want to know...
 

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I may open up a whole new can of worms with this one, but fences I have installed, I have used #2 crushed limestone for a post base and to surround the posts. I learned that one from a company that only builds fences. It is supposed to avoid any chance of problems with frost heave. Yes, I know dig post holes down below the frost line, but the thinking is this: Who's post holes are always perfect cylinders? Admittedly, mine often have a little bit of a cone shape, especially at the top, leaving the chance of heave. Stone would certainly eliminate the rush of setting posts / placing concrete or hand mixing bags. See this pics on this link to see what I'm getting at. I have seen this concept addressed on line on several different websites in the past, but this was the only one I could find today. (Alapaca's...what???) BTW, 1st time poster, short time reader from southeast michigan also. Don't beat me up too bad!
Perfect. the 'all important' crushed gravel for post base drainage.:thumbsup:

This is an important step. Thanks fo that!
 

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I may open up a whole new can of worms with this one, but fences I have installed, I have used #2 crushed limestone for a post base and to surround the posts. I learned that one from a company that only builds fences. It is supposed to avoid any chance of problems with frost heave. Yes, I know dig post holes down below the frost line, but the thinking is this: Who's post holes are always perfect cylinders? Admittedly, mine often have a little bit of a cone shape, especially at the top, leaving the chance of heave. Stone would certainly eliminate the rush of setting posts / placing concrete or hand mixing bags. See this pics on this link to see what I'm getting at. I have seen this concept addressed on line on several different websites in the past, but this was the only one I could find today. (Alapaca's...what???) BTW, 1st time poster, short time reader from southeast michigan also. Don't beat me up too bad!
I saw someone use crushed limestone instead of footings for sheds.
 
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