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Well, you're the consultant here right?
What's your plan?

But let me try anyway: (without all the pertenent details)

1) Not a concrete defect but a structural steel issue. Drill and epoxy proper anchors and supports for whatever is above.

2) No comment

3) Structural Engineer will accept this or reject - contractor to complete as contracted.

4) Have structural engineer/architect to devise a "fix" - contractor to complete at his cost (if deemed his error/ommision)

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Chris,
Actually, all of these are concrete contractor-caused defects to be repaired at his cost. I know how to fix them. My question is, what should I do with him?! Should he complete the project? I think not.
 

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Not worth it. Ditch him. There are plenty of good concretors out there.
 

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Was the guy working with updated/revised drawings? It seems he is off on everything... If he had the right drawings then you should get rid of him especially when he don't know how to follow drawings.
 

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Chris,
Actually, all of these are concrete contractor-caused defects to be repaired at his cost.
That's a pretty tough blanket statement there...

Maybe firing the guy would be doing him a favor:whistling
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's a seven story, PT slab, hotel job (300,000 sf). He started out OK, but the quality of his work fell way off after he sent his crew to a new job and replaced it with a new crew.

To make his story worse, he has refused to level these decks and is being backcharged for it. I've got a bunch of leveling photos.

The Architect is having a stroke over this stuff.
 

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Those deficiencies do not seem like deal breakers to me. How complete is the job? How easy is it for another contractor to finish - or rather - what decent contractor would want to finish the job? You might just be replacing a sub par contractor with another sub par contractor....

Work with what you have - have him fix the mistakes to the engineers approval, then move on. Though painful, probably less of two evils in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's a seven story, PT slab, hotel job (300,000 sf). He started out OK, but the quality of his work fell way off after he sent his crew to a new job and replaced it with a new crew.

To make his story worse, he has refused to level these decks and is being backcharged for it. I've got a bunch of leveling photos.

The Architect is having a stroke over this stuff.
 

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I've seen it before, the A crew starts the job with the foundations, garage and atypical floors and then replaces with the B crew to do the typical floors. It's not the best practice but its better then having the B crew work on the garage of your next bldg.

When the B crew comes in, this is were the site supervision has to step it up and watch them like a hawk.

However, no matter which crew is performing the work, they should still be able to get within 1/4" in 10' flat, even if they have to scarify and patch after -
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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Well we don't need to tell you the laws, obviously there is a contract written between 2 companies. I take it a site meeting was pointless.

The best I usually come up with is when someone doesn't see it or admit there is an issue, based on the photo's you posted I ask...would you accept this in your house? That's usually enough to get the guy to admit he has some issues.

Hell, your in California...my former stomping grounds...this is easy...document, document, document, put him on notice, give him a schedule (reasonable) for repairs and expected quality moving forward, if all else fails, you start with the bond and escalate from there.

I was a site super on townhouses and canned more subs this way, it's not an overnight process, but with documentation and patience this is not difficult.

If your client is building a 300,000 sq.ft. hotel I can assure you switching subs is not going to bankrupt them, they may have to cover the difference, but recovery is possible...no one wants to lose their CSLB license.
 
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