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It is proven that salt water can totally destroy the reinforcement. This was learned years ago in Miami.

The codes and recommendations say that you should use "potable" water (something you would normally drink).

The salts in the water can upset the chemical reaction, strngth and curing of concrete. The water does have to be purified like normal drinking water, but salts and chemicals can only do harm.

you don't need much water, so just get it from a tap somewhere nearby. fins someone near and give them a buck or two and hook up a hose to dump it into a 55 gallon barrel.

Any decent (or close to decent) concrete producer would never use salt water.
 
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I have seen concrete made with beach sand, not good.
Old bulkheads in our area used to be made with beach sand sometimes (you can see the shells) the concrete is real "punky" they lasted a good 50=yrs before total failing though.
 

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Concretemasonry has it right. If you used it on a commercial or Public Works job you'd demo alot of concrete after the tests came back & do it again with fresh water. Seen it spald off in big chunks when mixed with beach sand.

tgeb, yeah it probably would. Sounds like you've had a taste or two.:thumbup::clap:
 

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Concrete Mike
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any idea what effect adding salt water has to concrete as opposed to fresh water? Pros/Cons? Thanks

Johnny
Seawater containing up to 35,000ppm of dissolved solids is not harmful to the sterength of plain (unreinforced) concrete, but it may cause reinforcement to rust in reinforced concrete. Salt water should not be used as mixing water in steel-reinforced concrete. Also some water that is not drinkable, including recycled waters may also be used, but tests should be made of such water before use. They are called concrete reclaimers and gray water recycling, this water is not "potable" but is used in concrete. Impurities that make water not fit for drinking may affect the setting time, strength, appearance, and resistance to degradation. Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you. That's pretty much what I thought. My curiousity was sparked though when a friend of mine (who's not in the business, but one of those crazy fact machines) mentioned that adding salt water when mixing concrete can benefit the structure.

I did find an article in Concrete Monthly that I think he confused. It mentions a Nevada-based company named A.I.M. Resources, that came out with a "saltwater concrete." I guess they use saltwater in the production of the concrete, not in the mixing.

Anyway, thanks guys for reinforcing my initial thoughts. Never doubt yourself, huh?

Johnny
 
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