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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a good knowledge of home construction and remodeling. However I have a remodeling job that's got me thinking about point load on the footers. I am hoping that someone can offer me some expert advise.

I am joining two separate rooms that are adjacent to one another with a 2x12 header or possibly an engineered beam, this isn't the real concern. I am concerned with the point load at the support jacks for this long header. The header will be used on an outside wall that supports ceiling joist and roof rafters. The house is ranch style; gable 4:12 roof pitch; build in Indiana in 1972; standard crawl space with poured concrete footers.

I am specifically concerned about the foundation footers supporting the point load created from the 12 foot span of the header from the outside load bearing wall.

Basically I need to know if the concrete footer that was poured back in the 1972 will be strong enough to support the concentrated weight (point load) that will now exist from the distributed load of this long header.

Thanks for your input.
 

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Best to consult an engineer on issues like this but for what little its worth I'll share a recent experience. 14' span on first floor with full basement and bearing side for roof. Architect wasn't concerned with footings as the load spreads out at a 45 degree angle from the moment it hits the block, but with the point load on the first couple courses of block. He speced filling the first two courses of block with grout to handle the additional point load there. HO saw that and said no thanks, too expensive.

Engineers get paid to figure that sort of stuff out, let them do the math and be on the hook if it causes problems later.
 

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Design Build
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I have a good knowledge of home construction and remodeling. However I have a remodeling job that's got me thinking about point load on the footers. I am hoping that someone can offer me some expert advise.

I am joining two separate rooms that are adjacent to one another with a 2x12 header or possibly an engineered beam, this isn't the real concern. I am concerned with the point load at the support jacks for this long header. The header will be used on an outside wall that supports ceiling joist and roof rafters. The house is ranch style; gable 4:12 roof pitch; build in Indiana in 1972; standard crawl space with poured concrete footers.

I am specifically concerned about the foundation footers supporting the point load created from the 12 foot span of the header from the outside load bearing wall.

Basically I need to know if the concrete footer that was poured back in the 1972 will be strong enough to support the concentrated weight (point load) that will now exist from the distributed load of this long header.

Thanks for your input.
Re read that.

Without digging down and touching what is there, how can you expect to know what type of footing was poured in 1972? This is the internet...I could say, sure go ahead...or Hell no, don't go.

In all frankness....dig some holes where you are concerned and see for yourself. Making an assumption on loads is not wise. Asking strangers on a website can be just as bad.

Good luck...start diggin'
 

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Superior Firepower
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Garage headers are 16' or more and seldom use pad footings.

Many homes that are slab on grade incorporate footings designed to carry a second story.

Verify the grade beam dimensions as stated above and go from there.

A Structural Engineer will make you dig under the (e) footing and add concrete and steel. Mostly to cover his own butt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Garage headers are 16' or more and seldom use pad footings.

Many homes that are slab on grade incorporate footings designed to carry a second story.

Verify the grade beam dimensions as stated above and go from there.

A Structural Engineer will make you dig under the (e) footing and add concrete and steel. Mostly to cover his own butt.

Thanks Skyhook for your answer. Didn't think about the garage header. I realize that the size of the garage header will depend on if the roof is hip or gable however the footers are always the same.
 

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pretty standard practice around here to header out exterior walls for rear additions, with no additional reinforcement at footing/stem wall level. stem wall generally distributes the load over the footing so there is no point load in a poured foundation.

if you're loading a stand-alone footing via a post, then you may want to go wider/deeper depending on the actual load you're adding.
 
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