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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi, I need a little advice. I have learned a lot on this site. I am renovating a home that was two 19th century homes combined into one in the 30's. All is going well except that I need to get some proper support columns into the basement. At the moment there is one adjustable column supporting the end of an 8"x8" beam. This beam does not span the entire building and rest on the block foundation. One end of the beam is pocketed into the foundation. The other end just runs wild. The beam is 15' long and 48" of the wild end supports a load bearing wall above it. The adjustable column is really stout with a 1 1/2" diameter screw. What I'm worried about is point load on the basement floor. This column has been here for 75 years and is holding just fine. But with the extent of my renovation (complete gut out to studs), the building inspector is not going to let it fly. I also have another column less than a foot away that was set in the floor when it was poured. That column supports a beam that runs perpendicular to the first. This second beam is 24' long and is rotten. I am going to replace it with an lvl beam. Do to space limitations I can't tie the first beam into the second. I also have one other beam that runs wild and only has a 4"x4" holding it up (only supporting floor joists of first floor). My question is, where can I find good columns (not Home Depot cheapies) and installation suggestions. I know I have to break up the floor and put in footings. Can I use tube forms and still meet code? Any advice would really be appreciated. Thanks, Mike
 

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Not sure I completely understand the question becuase Im not a remodeler but if I get the jest of it what you need is support colums, right? Well how about getting a mason in there and running 6" or 8" block up to your beams. You would still rip out floor of course and put down footings.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What I'm looking for is steel columns or posts. The building centers in my area only sell supplemental posts. They are light gauge metal, two piece, adjustable posts with a 3/4" screw rated at 12,000 lbs at 6'. I'm looking something a little more substantial. Also, I am curious as to what my options are for setting the post. I'm not seeing much info in the code book (Comm 21.15 b) on this topic. Am I even looking at the correct passage? As I mentioned in my first query, one of the beam ends I need to support is about 12" away from another beam with a post set into the floor. There is no way to know what type of footing that post is sitting on until the floor is opened up though. The post is filled with concrete. What are the generally accepted practices for posts that are this close in proximity.
 

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In my area steel columns are supplied by the companies who supply steel commercial doors and metal frames, custom bent rebar, among other things. They make posts to any size and load requirement. I think the rest of your question might require more info. sounds like a good size project. Might be time to bring a structrual engineer in. They are not that expensive. RT
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rob 53 said:
In my area steel columns are supplied by the companies who supply steel commercial doors and metal frames, custom bent rebar, among other things. They make posts to any size and load requirement. I think the rest of your question might require more info. sounds like a good size project. Might be time to bring a structrual engineer in. They are not that expensive. RT
Oh, I know that I've made it sound more complex than it really is. :rolleyes: (sorry about that) This house is only 24'x31'. It is a 1 1/2 story farm house. As I mentioned, two buildings combined. I have an Autocad drawing that I could send if that would help. I tried to attach a file but it's a little to big. The beam that I want to support is in the basement supporting the floor joists of the first floor for half of the house. On that first floor is a 5' long wall that supports the stair stringers going to the second floor and a few of the floor joists for the second floor.
 

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The typical(concrete filled) lally column we install has a load rating of a least 16,000 lbs. These are typicaly installed on a 2'x2' footing with top of footing flush with bottom of basement or garage slab which locks bottom of column in place. Steel(not concrete filled) columns are mostly used with steel i-beams. To cut lallys a large pipe cutter works best but a grinder with cutoff wheel will also work, cut lally col 1/4" long to ensure a tight fit.
 

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mike959 said:
Oh, I know that I've made it sound more complex than it really is. :rolleyes: (sorry about that) This house is only 24'x31'. It is a 1 1/2 story farm house. As I mentioned, two buildings combined. I have an Autocad drawing that I could send if that would help. I tried to attach a file but it's a little to big. The beam that I want to support is in the basement supporting the floor joists of the first floor for half of the house. On that first floor is a 5' long wall that supports the stair stringers going to the second floor and a few of the floor joists for the second floor.
I would say do up a drawing the way you think it should be done, bring it to the building dept and see what they say since what they say would be more important than what any of us here might say. Where I live a drawing would be required to pull a permit. The building official will reject the parts of the plan that are under designed then i can make corrections and resubmit. In your area they might actually help you with the design. Lots of different building codes out there. Here in Colorado Springs we are changing from the Universal building code to the International building code next month. Might be time to retire. RT.
 

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bergenbldr said:
The typical(concrete filled) lally column we install has a load rating of a least 16,000 lbs. These are typicaly installed on a 2'x2' footing with top of footing flush with bottom of basement or garage slab which locks bottom of column in place. Steel(not concrete filled) columns are mostly used with steel i-beams. To cut lallys a large pipe cutter works best but a grinder with cutoff wheel will also work, cut lally col 1/4" long to ensure a tight fit.
I like Lally columns but have not used them since i left Northern NJ. 28 years ago. I'm pretty certain that they never caught on in the Western states. North Jersey had that unique style of framing, (which I thought was the best), but I never saw that in any other parts of the country either. Still use 5/4 bracing? RT > I guess I'm thinking your the guy from Bergen County NJ. I apologize if i assumed wrongly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rob 53 said:
I would say do up a drawing the way you think it should be done, bring it to the building dept and see what they say since what they say would be more important than what any of us here might say. Where I live a drawing would be required to pull a permit. The building official will reject the parts of the plan that are under designed then i can make corrections and resubmit. In your area they might actually help you with the design. Lots of different building codes out there. Here in Colorado Springs we are changing from the Universal building code to the International building code next month. Might be time to retire. RT.
Yes the building official has been very helpful along the way. I had a problem where someone had moved a loadbearing wall on the first floor and not supported it from below. It was amazing that it had stood for so long. The wall they had put in didn't have top or bottom plates and the studs were just set on the plank subfloor, not even over the joists. The building inspector allowed me to build a 2" x 6" stud wall in the basement to support this. Then I was able to build a new wall on the first floor. Due to space limitations, I can't use that option for this beam though. I just try to educate myself before I do any of this work or approach the inspector. I have worked on a number of complete renovations over the years. This house just has so many things that deviate from common building practices even for it's age.
 

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Rob 53 said:
I like Lally columns but have not used them since i left Northern NJ. 28 years ago. I'm pretty certain that they never caught on in the Western states. North Jersey had that unique style of framing, (which I thought was the best), but I never saw that in any other parts of the country either. Still use 5/4 bracing? RT > I guess I'm thinking your the guy from Bergen County NJ. I apologize if i assumed wrongly.
Rob, everything here is fully sheathed with plywood or osb only exeption being commercial steel framing which gets densglass.5/4 nailed to inside is used as a temporary braceing,gets pulled off after sheathing and recycled for nailers etc. Was the current framing system of plates all nailed over each other top plate tacked to bottom ,then toe nail studs to top in use 28 years ago.
 

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bergenbldr said:
Rob, everything here is fully sheathed with plywood or osb only exeption being commercial steel framing which gets densglass.5/4 nailed to inside is used as a temporary braceing,gets pulled off after sheathing and recycled for nailers etc. Was the current framing system of plates all nailed over each other top plate tacked to bottom ,then toe nail studs to top in use 28 years ago.
Yep, That's the way I like to frame and learned to frame. When I moved away framers about had a heart attack if i mentioned toe nailing studs so I learned to do it the other way. Then I ran framers for 20 years and it was easier to go the way that the guys were used to but once in a while i reverted to the right way. Yes 5/4 temp bracing and plywood or osb sheathing. When I left NJ most of the country was using the old blackboard sheathing, then we went to foilback foam and then some cardboard crap. Very late 90's Colorado went pretty much 100% osb. I don't know what took them so long. Maybe we'll be toe nailing studs soon lol. Havn't seen a piece of 5/4 on the job in 28 years. I should come back there and help someone frame a house just for kicks. Maybe get my brother up from NC. and see if we can still do it. I worked on some great crews back there. RT
 

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I concur. Someone should come up with a name for that style of framing. RT.>> Sorry we jumped thread Mike. I'll take a look at your sketches if you can get them to me. RT
 
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